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Assimilation lighting of Cordyline: an economic evaluation

Luc Balemans and C Dugardin (1992) LANDBOUWTIJDSCHRIFT-REVUE DE L AGRICULTURE. 45(1). p.19-27
abstract
The commercial value of Cordyline is determined both by its red leaf colour and by the overall plant length. During winter, the growth rate slows down, and at the same time less red coloured leaves are formed. A greenhouse trial was organized to assess the possibility of improving the crop's market value by making use of artificial light. The experimental stand contained Cordyline cv. Prins Albert and received high pressure sodium light supplements from November 1990 to February 1991. Total day length (natural + artificial) was set at 15.5 h. Light intensities and the corresponding temperature increases were measured at crop level. Between 15 and 85-mu-mol/(m2.s), 8 light intensity classes were distinguished; the control plot received only natural light. During the growing period, the plant heights were measured at regular intervals, showing no particular discrepancies among the various classes. The effect of applying light supplements was most evident between the 3rd and 6th week after planting. Both plant length and leaf colouring were evaluated when the plants were transferred to pots. Differences between classes could primarily be attributed to differences in intensity of the light supplement received; the effect of the temperature increases (< 1.5 K) on either parameter was negligible. Plant height and the percentage of red coloured leaves were shown to be exponentially related to light intensity class. Potted Cordyline is valorized according to overall plant height. Calculated financial gain as compared to control was also exponentially related to light intensity class. The costs of providing a light supplement, i.e. luminaire and lamp cost and consumption of electricity, increase almost linearly with increasing light intensity. When electricity consumption is charged according to the special advantageous high tension rates as provided by the public supplier, and taking into account a total day length of 16 h, lighting costs exceed the financial gains from 45-mu-mol/(m2.s) (+/- 3200 lx for high pressure sodium lamps) onwards. The optimum light supplement intensity, this is the intensity with which to achieve maximum financial benefit, was situated at 20-mu-mol/(m2.s) (+/- 1430 lx). However, since the minimum intensity at which sufficient uniformity can be guaranteed with the current luminaire types, is about 25-mu-mol/(m2.s) (+/- 1800 lx), the latter value is put forward as the optimum. Under those conditions, the experimental financial benefits amounted to 37.4 BF/m2.
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author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
journal title
LANDBOUWTIJDSCHRIFT-REVUE DE L AGRICULTURE
Landbouwtijdschr.-Rev. Agr.
volume
45
issue
1
pages
19 - 27
Web of Science type
Article
ISSN
0776-2143
language
Dutch
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
205715
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-205715
date created
2004-01-14 13:42:00
date last changed
2015-08-17 09:20:07
@article{205715,
  abstract     = {The commercial value of Cordyline is determined both by its red leaf colour and by the overall plant length. During winter, the growth rate slows down, and at the same time less red coloured leaves are formed. A greenhouse trial was organized to assess the possibility of improving the crop's market value by making use of artificial light. The experimental stand contained Cordyline cv. Prins Albert and received high pressure sodium light supplements from November 1990 to February 1991. Total day length (natural + artificial) was set at 15.5 h. Light intensities and the corresponding temperature increases were measured at crop level. Between 15 and 85-mu-mol/(m2.s), 8 light intensity classes were distinguished; the control plot received only natural light. During the growing period, the plant heights were measured at regular intervals, showing no particular discrepancies among the various classes. The effect of applying light supplements was most evident between the 3rd and 6th week after planting. Both plant length and leaf colouring were evaluated when the plants were transferred to pots. Differences between classes could primarily be attributed to differences in intensity of the light supplement received; the effect of the temperature increases ({\textlangle} 1.5 K) on either parameter was negligible. Plant height and the percentage of red coloured leaves were shown to be exponentially related to light intensity class. 
Potted Cordyline is valorized according to overall plant height. Calculated financial gain as compared to control was also exponentially related to light intensity class. The costs of providing a light supplement, i.e. luminaire and lamp cost and consumption of electricity, increase almost linearly with increasing light intensity. When electricity consumption is charged according to the special advantageous high tension rates as provided by the public supplier, and taking into account a total day length of 16 h, lighting costs exceed the financial gains from 45-mu-mol/(m2.s) (+/- 3200 lx for high pressure sodium lamps) onwards. The optimum light supplement intensity, this is the intensity with which to achieve maximum financial benefit, was situated at 20-mu-mol/(m2.s) (+/- 1430 lx). However, since the minimum intensity at which sufficient uniformity can be guaranteed with the current luminaire types, is about 25-mu-mol/(m2.s) (+/- 1800 lx), the latter value is put forward as the optimum. Under those conditions, the experimental financial benefits amounted to 37.4 BF/m2.},
  author       = {Balemans, Luc and Dugardin, C},
  issn         = {0776-2143},
  journal      = {LANDBOUWTIJDSCHRIFT-REVUE DE L AGRICULTURE},
  language     = {dut},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {19--27},
  title        = {Assimilation lighting of Cordyline: an economic evaluation},
  volume       = {45},
  year         = {1992},
}

Chicago
Balemans, Luc, and C Dugardin. 1992. “Assimilation Lighting of Cordyline: An Economic Evaluation.” Landbouwtijdschrift-revue De L Agriculture 45 (1): 19–27.
APA
Balemans, L., & Dugardin, C. (1992). Assimilation lighting of Cordyline: an economic evaluation. LANDBOUWTIJDSCHRIFT-REVUE DE L AGRICULTURE, 45(1), 19–27.
Vancouver
1.
Balemans L, Dugardin C. Assimilation lighting of Cordyline: an economic evaluation. LANDBOUWTIJDSCHRIFT-REVUE DE L AGRICULTURE. 1992;45(1):19–27.
MLA
Balemans, Luc, and C Dugardin. “Assimilation Lighting of Cordyline: An Economic Evaluation.” LANDBOUWTIJDSCHRIFT-REVUE DE L AGRICULTURE 45.1 (1992): 19–27. Print.