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Monitoring and modelling transport and emissions of volatile organic compounds during soil remediation

Jo Bonroy UGent (2012)
abstract
This dissertation deals with monitoring and modelling transport of gaseous pollutants in soils. The knowledge of the gas transport processes is important in soil remediation projects such as (bio)venting, and soil vapour extraction. An important aspect of these soil venting remediation techniques is the risk for VOC emissions to the atmosphere. Most of the models describe the gas flow for these remediation projects based on the convection-dispersion model. In this dissertation two rapid measurement devices were described to measure some of the parameters of the convection-dispersion equation. With the proposed devices, the effective air-filled porosity, the soil gas diffusion coefficient and soil gas dispersion coefficient can be measured automatically preventing the need to use approximate pedotransfer functions. In a next phase, a sensor device for in-situ, passive concentration measurements in the soil gas phase was developed. The prototype measured the O2 and CO2 concentration and an equivalent concentration of a broad range of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the soil vapour phase. Mass balances of the volatile organic compound in a column test measured with the prototype have illustrated successfully the performance of the sensor in soil systems with a recovery that ranged from 90 to 101 % of the injected decane mass. The data generated by the devices was used to develop a predictive modelling system for the determination of the VOC emission towards the surface. The method assimilated sensor readouts in gas transport models to predict soil gas concentration profiles and emissions to the atmosphere during operation. During a column test, an increasing set of sensor gas concentration data became available for the continuous adaptive improvement of the model parameter estimates. The VOC concentrations near the soil surface and the associated VOC emission rates to the atmosphere were predicted with an accuracy ranging from 60 to 86 % depending on the number of sensors and their placing. The positioning of sensors near the contaminant source and near the soil surface was found to be optimal for fast and accurate prediction of VOC concentrations at the soil surface and in emissions. It was, therefore, concluded the predictive model could be used to control soil venting remediation techniques for optimisation with strict VOC emission control.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
promoter
UGent
organization
alternative title
Opvolgen en modelleeren van transport en emissies van vluchtige organische verbindingen tijdens bodemsanering
year
type
dissertation (monograph)
subject
keyword
convection, dispersion, diffusion, soil venting, VOC, volatile organic compound, sensors, modelling, remediation
pages
XXVI, 220 pages
publisher
Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering
place of publication
Ghent, Belgium
defense location
Gent : Faculteit Bio-ingenieurswetenschappen (A0.030)
defense date
2012-03-07 15:30
ISBN
9789059895058
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
D1
id
2056996
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2056996
date created
2012-03-02 11:27:06
date last changed
2012-03-05 08:50:47
@phdthesis{2056996,
  abstract     = {This dissertation deals with monitoring and modelling transport of gaseous pollutants in soils. The knowledge of the gas transport processes is important in soil remediation projects such as (bio)venting, and soil vapour extraction. An important aspect of these soil venting remediation techniques is the risk for VOC emissions to the atmosphere.
Most of the models describe the gas flow for these remediation projects based on the convection-dispersion model. In this dissertation two rapid measurement devices were described to measure some of the parameters of the convection-dispersion equation. With the proposed devices, the effective air-filled porosity, the soil gas diffusion coefficient and soil gas dispersion coefficient can be measured automatically preventing the need to use approximate pedotransfer functions.
In a next phase, a sensor device for in-situ, passive concentration measurements in the soil gas phase was developed. The prototype measured the O2 and CO2 concentration and an equivalent concentration of a broad range of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the soil vapour phase. Mass balances of the volatile organic compound in a column test measured with the prototype have illustrated successfully the performance of the sensor in soil systems with a recovery that ranged from 90 to 101 \% of the injected decane mass.
The data generated by the devices was used to develop a predictive modelling system for the determination of the VOC emission towards the surface. The method assimilated sensor readouts in gas transport models to predict soil gas concentration profiles and emissions to the atmosphere during operation. During a column test, an increasing set of sensor gas concentration data became available for the continuous adaptive improvement of the model parameter estimates. The VOC concentrations near the soil surface and the associated VOC emission rates to the atmosphere were predicted with an accuracy ranging from 60 to 86 \% depending on the number of sensors and their placing. The positioning of sensors near the contaminant source and near the soil surface was found to be optimal for fast and accurate prediction of VOC concentrations at the soil surface and in emissions. It was, therefore, concluded the predictive model could be used to control soil venting remediation techniques for optimisation with strict VOC emission control.},
  author       = {Bonroy, Jo},
  isbn         = {9789059895058},
  keyword      = {convection,dispersion,diffusion,soil venting,VOC,volatile organic compound,sensors,modelling,remediation},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {XXVI, 220},
  publisher    = {Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering},
  school       = {Ghent University},
  title        = {Monitoring and modelling transport and emissions of volatile organic compounds during soil remediation},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Bonroy, Jo. 2012. “Monitoring and Modelling Transport and Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds During Soil Remediation”. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering.
APA
Bonroy, J. (2012). Monitoring and modelling transport and emissions of volatile organic compounds during soil remediation. Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent, Belgium.
Vancouver
1.
Bonroy J. Monitoring and modelling transport and emissions of volatile organic compounds during soil remediation. [Ghent, Belgium]: Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering; 2012.
MLA
Bonroy, Jo. “Monitoring and Modelling Transport and Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds During Soil Remediation.” 2012 : n. pag. Print.