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Does canopy mean nitrogen concentration explain variation in canopy light use efficiency across 14 contrasting forest sites?

Mikko Peltoniemi, Minna Pulkkinen, Pasi Kolari, Remko A Duursma, Leonardo Montagnani, Sonia Wharton, Fredrik Lagergren, Kentaro Takagi, Hans Verbeeck UGent and Torben Christensen, et al. (2012) TREE PHYSIOLOGY. 32(2). p.200-218
abstract
The maximum light use efficiency (LUE = gross primary production (GPP)/absorbed photosynthetic photon flux density (aPPFD)) of plant canopies has been reported to vary spatially and some of this variation has previously been attributed to plant species differences. The canopy nitrogen concentration [N] can potentially explain some of this spatial variation. However, the current paradigm of the N-effect on photosynthesis is largely based on the relationship between photosynthetic capacity (A(max)) and [N], i.e., the effects of [N] on photosynthesis rates appear under high PPFD. A maximum LUE-[N] relationship, if it existed, would influence photosynthesis in the whole range of PPFD. We estimated maximum LUE for 14 eddy-covariance forest sites, examined its [N] dependency and investigated how the [N]-maximum LUE dependency could be incorporated into a GPP model. In the model, maximum LUE corresponds to LUE under optimal environmental conditions before light saturation takes place (the slope of GPP vs. PPFD under low PPFD). Maximum LUE was higher in deciduous/mixed than in coniferous sites, and correlated significantly with canopy mean [N]. Correlations between maximum LUE and canopy [N] existed regardless of daily PPFD, although we expected the correlation to disappear under low PPFD when LUE was also highest. Despite these correlations, including [N] in the model of GPP only marginally decreased the root mean squared error. Our results suggest that maximum LUE correlates linearly with canopy [N], but that a larger body of data is required before we can include this relationship into a GPP model. Gross primary production will therefore positively correlate with [N] already at low PPFD, and not only at high PPFD as is suggested by the prevailing paradigm of leaf-level A(max)-[N] relationships. This finding has consequences for modelling GPP driven by temporal changes or spatial variation in canopy [N].
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
eddy covariance, canopy nitrogen concentration, gross primary production, light use efficiency, quantum yield, vegetation productivity, LEAF-AREA INDEX, GROSS PRIMARY PRODUCTION, OLD-GROWTH FOREST, PHOTOSYNTHETICALLY ACTIVE RADIATION, NET ECOSYSTEM EXCHANGE, LONG-TERM MEASUREMENTS, SIBERIAN PINE FOREST, SCOTS PINE, PACIFIC-NORTHWEST, CARBON BALANCE
journal title
TREE PHYSIOLOGY
Tree Physiol.
volume
32
issue
2
pages
200 - 218
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000300988800010
JCR category
FORESTRY
JCR impact factor
2.853 (2012)
JCR rank
2/60 (2012)
JCR quartile
1 (2012)
ISSN
0829-318X
DOI
10.1093/treephys/tpr140
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2056521
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2056521
date created
2012-03-02 10:24:11
date last changed
2012-04-04 10:08:42
@article{2056521,
  abstract     = {The maximum light use efficiency (LUE = gross primary production (GPP)/absorbed photosynthetic photon flux density (aPPFD)) of plant canopies has been reported to vary spatially and some of this variation has previously been attributed to plant species differences. The canopy nitrogen concentration [N] can potentially explain some of this spatial variation. However, the current paradigm of the N-effect on photosynthesis is largely based on the relationship between photosynthetic capacity (A(max)) and [N], i.e., the effects of [N] on photosynthesis rates appear under high PPFD. A maximum LUE-[N] relationship, if it existed, would influence photosynthesis in the whole range of PPFD. We estimated maximum LUE for 14 eddy-covariance forest sites, examined its [N] dependency and investigated how the [N]-maximum LUE dependency could be incorporated into a GPP model. In the model, maximum LUE corresponds to LUE under optimal environmental conditions before light saturation takes place (the slope of GPP vs. PPFD under low PPFD). Maximum LUE was higher in deciduous/mixed than in coniferous sites, and correlated significantly with canopy mean [N]. Correlations between maximum LUE and canopy [N] existed regardless of daily PPFD, although we expected the correlation to disappear under low PPFD when LUE was also highest. Despite these correlations, including [N] in the model of GPP only marginally decreased the root mean squared error. Our results suggest that maximum LUE correlates linearly with canopy [N], but that a larger body of data is required before we can include this relationship into a GPP model. Gross primary production will therefore positively correlate with [N] already at low PPFD, and not only at high PPFD as is suggested by the prevailing paradigm of leaf-level A(max)-[N] relationships. This finding has consequences for modelling GPP driven by temporal changes or spatial variation in canopy [N].},
  author       = {Peltoniemi, Mikko and Pulkkinen, Minna and Kolari, Pasi and Duursma, Remko A and Montagnani, Leonardo and Wharton, Sonia and Lagergren, Fredrik and Takagi, Kentaro and Verbeeck, Hans and Christensen, Torben and Vesala, Timo and Falk, Matthias and Loustau, Denis and M{\"a}kel{\"a}, Annikki},
  issn         = {0829-318X},
  journal      = {TREE PHYSIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {eddy covariance,canopy nitrogen concentration,gross primary production,light use efficiency,quantum yield,vegetation productivity,LEAF-AREA INDEX,GROSS PRIMARY PRODUCTION,OLD-GROWTH FOREST,PHOTOSYNTHETICALLY ACTIVE RADIATION,NET ECOSYSTEM EXCHANGE,LONG-TERM MEASUREMENTS,SIBERIAN PINE FOREST,SCOTS PINE,PACIFIC-NORTHWEST,CARBON BALANCE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {200--218},
  title        = {Does canopy mean nitrogen concentration explain variation in canopy light use efficiency across 14 contrasting forest sites?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/treephys/tpr140},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Peltoniemi, Mikko, Minna Pulkkinen, Pasi Kolari, Remko A Duursma, Leonardo Montagnani, Sonia Wharton, Fredrik Lagergren, et al. 2012. “Does Canopy Mean Nitrogen Concentration Explain Variation in Canopy Light Use Efficiency Across 14 Contrasting Forest Sites?” Tree Physiology 32 (2): 200–218.
APA
Peltoniemi, M., Pulkkinen, M., Kolari, P., Duursma, R. A., Montagnani, L., Wharton, S., Lagergren, F., et al. (2012). Does canopy mean nitrogen concentration explain variation in canopy light use efficiency across 14 contrasting forest sites? TREE PHYSIOLOGY, 32(2), 200–218.
Vancouver
1.
Peltoniemi M, Pulkkinen M, Kolari P, Duursma RA, Montagnani L, Wharton S, et al. Does canopy mean nitrogen concentration explain variation in canopy light use efficiency across 14 contrasting forest sites? TREE PHYSIOLOGY. 2012;32(2):200–18.
MLA
Peltoniemi, Mikko, Minna Pulkkinen, Pasi Kolari, et al. “Does Canopy Mean Nitrogen Concentration Explain Variation in Canopy Light Use Efficiency Across 14 Contrasting Forest Sites?” TREE PHYSIOLOGY 32.2 (2012): 200–218. Print.