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Developmental delay of infants and young children with and without fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in the Northern Cape Province, South Africa

L Davies, M Dunn, Matthew Chersich UGent, M Urban, C Chetty, L Olivier and D Viljoen (2011) AFRICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY. 14(4). p.298-305
abstract
Objective: To describe the extent and nature of developmental delay at different stages in childhood in a community in South Africa, with a known high rate of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). Method: A cohort of infants, clinically examined for FASD at two time periods, 7-12 months (N= 392; 45 FASD) and 17-21 months of age (N= 83, 35 FASD) were assessed using the Griffiths Mental Developmental Scales (GMDS). Results: Infants and children with FASD perform worse than their Non-FASD counterparts over all scales and total developmental quotients. Mean quotients for both groups decline between assessments across subscales with a particularly marked decline in the hearing and language scale at Time 2 (scores dropping from 110.6 to 83.1 in the Non-FASD group and 106.3 to 72.7 in the FASD group; P=0.004). By early childhood the developmental gap between the groups widens with low maternal education, maternal depression, high parity and previous loss of sibling/s influencing development during early childhood. Conclusion: The FASD group show more evidence of developmental delay over both time points compared to their Non-FASD counterparts. Demographic and socio-economic factors further impact early childhood. These findings are important in setting up primary level psycho-educational and national prevention programmes especially in peri-urban communities with a focus on early childhood development and FASD.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL DEFICITS, DEVELOPING-COUNTRIES, RISK-FACTORS, Griffiths Mental Developmental Scales (GMDS), Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), Developmental Delay, MATERNAL DEPRESSION, ATTACHMENT SECURITY, FOLLOW-UP, EXPOSURE, COMMUNITY, EPIDEMIOLOGY, RECOGNITION
journal title
AFRICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY
Afr. J. Psychiatry
volume
14
issue
4
pages
298 - 305
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000298312600011
JCR category
PSYCHIATRY
JCR impact factor
1.068 (2011)
JCR rank
76/115 (2011)
JCR quartile
3 (2011)
ISSN
1994-8220
DOI
10.4314/ajpsy.v14i4.7
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2055368
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2055368
date created
2012-03-01 12:56:07
date last changed
2017-12-04 09:45:17
@article{2055368,
  abstract     = {Objective: To describe the extent and nature of developmental delay at different stages in childhood in a community in South Africa, with a known high rate of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).
Method: A cohort of infants, clinically examined for FASD at two time periods, 7-12 months (N= 392; 45 FASD) and 17-21 months of age (N= 83, 35 FASD) were assessed using the Griffiths Mental Developmental Scales (GMDS).
Results: Infants and children with FASD perform worse than their Non-FASD counterparts over all scales and total developmental quotients. Mean quotients for both groups decline between assessments across subscales with a particularly marked decline in the hearing and language scale at Time 2 (scores dropping from 110.6 to 83.1 in the Non-FASD group and 106.3 to 72.7 in the FASD group; P=0.004). By early childhood the developmental gap between the groups widens with low maternal education, maternal depression, high parity and previous loss of sibling/s influencing development during early childhood.
Conclusion: The FASD group show more evidence of developmental delay over both time points compared to their Non-FASD counterparts. Demographic and socio-economic factors further impact early childhood. These findings are important in setting up primary level psycho-educational and national prevention programmes especially in peri-urban communities with a focus on early childhood development and FASD.},
  author       = {Davies, L and Dunn, M and Chersich, Matthew and Urban, M and Chetty, C and Olivier, L and Viljoen, D},
  issn         = {1994-8220},
  journal      = {AFRICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY},
  keyword      = {NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL DEFICITS,DEVELOPING-COUNTRIES,RISK-FACTORS,Griffiths Mental Developmental Scales (GMDS),Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS),Developmental Delay,MATERNAL DEPRESSION,ATTACHMENT SECURITY,FOLLOW-UP,EXPOSURE,COMMUNITY,EPIDEMIOLOGY,RECOGNITION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {298--305},
  title        = {Developmental delay of infants and young children with and without fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in the Northern Cape Province, South Africa},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ajpsy.v14i4.7},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Davies, L, M Dunn, Matthew Chersich, M Urban, C Chetty, L Olivier, and D Viljoen. 2011. “Developmental Delay of Infants and Young Children with and Without Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder in the Northern Cape Province, South Africa.” African Journal of Psychiatry 14 (4): 298–305.
APA
Davies, L., Dunn, M., Chersich, M., Urban, M., Chetty, C., Olivier, L., & Viljoen, D. (2011). Developmental delay of infants and young children with and without fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in the Northern Cape Province, South Africa. AFRICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, 14(4), 298–305.
Vancouver
1.
Davies L, Dunn M, Chersich M, Urban M, Chetty C, Olivier L, et al. Developmental delay of infants and young children with and without fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in the Northern Cape Province, South Africa. AFRICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY. 2011;14(4):298–305.
MLA
Davies, L, M Dunn, Matthew Chersich, et al. “Developmental Delay of Infants and Young Children with and Without Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder in the Northern Cape Province, South Africa.” AFRICAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY 14.4 (2011): 298–305. Print.