Advanced search
1 file | 102.25 KB

Participation in ECEC programs: equity, diversity and educational disadvantage

Author
Organization
Abstract
There is a consensus among researchers that children benefit from high quality early childhood education and that these beneficial effects are most salient for children at risk for developmental delays. However, different studies have also shown that children from poor families are over-represented in early childhood education of poor quality. Policies that favor funding by local or central authorities are more effective in enhancing accessibility than market-oriented policies. Further, we discuss what quality may mean in contexts of diversity. Child-centered curricula that take into account children’s and families’ diverse perspectives are more successful in creating profitable learning spaces. This asks for reflective practitioners that document their educational practices and that strive for belonging and involvement, rather than for parents’ participation.
Keywords
policy, equity, diversity, Accessibility, quality

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 102.25 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Vandenbroeck, Michel. 2010. “Participation in ECEC Programs: Equity, Diversity and Educational Disadvantage.” In International Encyclopedia of Education, ed. Penelope Peterson, Eva Baker, and Barry McGaw, 2:81–85. 3rd ed. Oxford, UK: Elsevier.
APA
Vandenbroeck, M. (2010). Participation in ECEC programs: equity, diversity and educational disadvantage. In P. Peterson, E. Baker, & B. McGaw (Eds.), International encyclopedia of education (3rd ed., Vol. 2, pp. 81–85). Oxford, UK: Elsevier.
Vancouver
1.
Vandenbroeck M. Participation in ECEC programs: equity, diversity and educational disadvantage. In: Peterson P, Baker E, McGaw B, editors. International encyclopedia of education. 3rd ed. Oxford, UK: Elsevier; 2010. p. 81–5.
MLA
Vandenbroeck, Michel. “Participation in ECEC Programs: Equity, Diversity and Educational Disadvantage.” International Encyclopedia of Education. 3rd ed. Ed. Penelope Peterson, Eva Baker, & Barry McGaw. Vol. 2. Oxford, UK: Elsevier, 2010. 81–85. Print.
@incollection{2054094,
  abstract     = {There is a consensus among researchers that children benefit from high quality early childhood education and that these beneficial effects are most salient for children at risk for developmental delays. However, different studies have also shown that children from poor families are over-represented in early childhood education of poor quality. Policies that favor funding by local or central authorities are more effective in enhancing accessibility than market-oriented policies. Further, we discuss what quality may mean in contexts of diversity. Child-centered curricula that take into account children{\textquoteright}s and families{\textquoteright} diverse perspectives are more successful in creating profitable learning spaces. This asks for reflective practitioners that document their educational practices and that strive for belonging and involvement, rather than for parents{\textquoteright} participation.},
  author       = {Vandenbroeck, Michel},
  booktitle    = {International encyclopedia of education},
  editor       = {Peterson, Penelope  and Baker, Eva and McGaw, Barry},
  isbn         = {9780080448930},
  keyword      = {policy,equity,diversity,Accessibility,quality},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {81--85},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  title        = {Participation in ECEC programs: equity, diversity and educational disadvantage},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2010},
}