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Is translated language more standardized than non-translated language? Using profile-based correspondence analysis for measuring linguistic distances between language varieties

Isabelle Delaere (UGent) , Gert De Sutter (UGent) and Koen Plevoets (UGent)
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Abstract
With this article, we seek to support the law of growing standardization by showing that texts translated into Belgian Dutch make more use of standard language than non-translated Belgian Dutch texts. Additionally, we want to examine whether the use of standard vs. non-standard language can be attributed to the variables text type and source language. In order to achieve that goal, we gathered a diverse set of linguistic variables and used a 10-million-word corpus that is parallel, comparable and bidirectional (the Dutch Parallel Corpus; Macken et al. 2011). The frequency counts for each of the variables are used to determine the differences in standard language use by means of profile-based correspondence analysis (Plevoets 2008). The results of our analysis show that (i) in general, there is indeed a standardizing trend among translations and (ii) text types with a lot of editorial control (fiction, non-fiction and journalistic texts) contain more standard language than the less edited text types (administrative texts and external communication) which adds support for the idea that the differences between translated and non-translated texts are text type dependent.
Keywords
profile-based correspondence analysis, standardization, Belgian Dutch, translated versus non-translated language, text type

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Chicago
Delaere, Isabelle, Gert De Sutter, and Koen Plevoets. 2012. “Is Translated Language More Standardized Than Non-translated Language? Using Profile-based Correspondence Analysis for Measuring Linguistic Distances Between Language Varieties.” Target-international Journal of Translation Studies 24 (2): 203–224.
APA
Delaere, I., De Sutter, G., & Plevoets, K. (2012). Is translated language more standardized than non-translated language? Using profile-based correspondence analysis for measuring linguistic distances between language varieties. TARGET-INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF TRANSLATION STUDIES, 24(2), 203–224.
Vancouver
1.
Delaere I, De Sutter G, Plevoets K. Is translated language more standardized than non-translated language? Using profile-based correspondence analysis for measuring linguistic distances between language varieties. TARGET-INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF TRANSLATION STUDIES. 2012;24(2):203–24.
MLA
Delaere, Isabelle, Gert De Sutter, and Koen Plevoets. “Is Translated Language More Standardized Than Non-translated Language? Using Profile-based Correspondence Analysis for Measuring Linguistic Distances Between Language Varieties.” TARGET-INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF TRANSLATION STUDIES 24.2 (2012): 203–224. Print.
@article{2053189,
  abstract     = {With this article, we seek to support the law of growing standardization by showing that texts translated into Belgian Dutch make more use of standard language than non-translated Belgian Dutch texts. Additionally, we want to examine whether the use of standard vs. non-standard language can be attributed to the variables text type and source language. In order to achieve that goal, we gathered a diverse set of linguistic variables and used a 10-million-word corpus that is parallel, comparable and bidirectional (the Dutch Parallel Corpus; Macken et al. 2011). The frequency counts for each of the variables are used to determine the differences in standard language use by means of profile-based correspondence analysis (Plevoets 2008). The results of our analysis show that (i) in general, there is indeed a standardizing trend among translations and (ii) text types with a lot of editorial control (fiction, non-fiction and journalistic texts) contain more standard language than the less edited text types (administrative texts and external communication) which adds support for the idea that the differences between translated and non-translated texts are text type dependent.},
  author       = {Delaere, Isabelle and De Sutter, Gert and Plevoets, Koen},
  issn         = {0924-1884},
  journal      = {TARGET-INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF TRANSLATION STUDIES},
  keyword      = {profile-based correspondence analysis,standardization,Belgian Dutch,translated versus non-translated language,text type},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {203--224},
  title        = {Is translated language more standardized than non-translated language? Using profile-based correspondence analysis for measuring linguistic distances between language varieties},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/target.24.2.01del},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2012},
}

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