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Use of the Amazonian tree species Inga edulis for soil regeneration and weed control

Bohdan Lojka, Daniel Preininger, Patrick Van Damme UGent, A Rollo and Jan Banout (2012) JOURNAL OF TROPICAL FOREST SCIENCE. 24(1). p.89-101
abstract
Land for agriculture in the tropics is often cleared through slash and burn, which is a shifting cultivation system. However, shortening of fallow periods led to soil degradation, decreased yields and increased weed pressure. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of short-term tree fallow of Inga edulis on weeds and soil fertility. We compared four treatments, namely, (1) natural fallow, (2) planted fallow with I. Midis, (3) planted fallow with I. edulis herbaceous cover crop kudzu (Pueraria phaseoloides) and (4) continuous cropping of cassava (Manihol esculenta). Tree and weed biomass amount and composition were determined at 3, 6, 9, 13, 17, 20, 24, 28 and 33 months after establishment, while soil samples at 17 and 25 months. The growth rate of I. edulis was slow when compared with other studies. However, improved fallows were able to significantly decrease aboveground weed biomass. Total biomass of improved fallows increased more rapidly than that of natural fallow and cassava cropping. There were no significant soil fertility differences between treatments and all fallows increased the organic matter in topsoil over time. Available P declined in all treatments but stocks of aboveground N, P and K increased more rapidly under improved fallows. Planted fallows using trees such as I. Mulls have the potential to reduce growth of weed species and improve some soil fertility parameters but, on highly degraded soil, a longer time and possibly P fertilisation may be needed to achieve these increases.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
TROPICAL FALLOWS, NUTRIENT STOCKS, MAIZE, PRODUCTIVITY, HUMID TROPICS, Peruvian Amazon, slash and burn farming, FERTILITY, GROWTH, improved fallow, Agroforestry, Imperata brasiliensis
journal title
JOURNAL OF TROPICAL FOREST SCIENCE
J. Trop. For. Sci.
volume
24
issue
1
pages
89 - 101
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000300337900011
JCR category
FORESTRY
JCR impact factor
0.537 (2012)
JCR rank
44/60 (2012)
JCR quartile
3 (2012)
ISSN
0128-1283
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2051252
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2051252
date created
2012-02-29 10:11:21
date last changed
2012-04-04 08:56:16
@article{2051252,
  abstract     = {Land for agriculture in the tropics is often cleared through slash and burn, which is a shifting cultivation system. However, shortening of fallow periods led to soil degradation, decreased yields and increased weed pressure. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of short-term tree fallow of Inga edulis on weeds and soil fertility. We compared four treatments, namely, (1) natural fallow, (2) planted fallow with I. Midis, (3) planted fallow with I. edulis herbaceous cover crop kudzu (Pueraria phaseoloides) and (4) continuous cropping of cassava (Manihol esculenta). Tree and weed biomass amount and composition were determined at 3, 6, 9, 13, 17, 20, 24, 28 and 33 months after establishment, while soil samples at 17 and 25 months. The growth rate of I. edulis was slow when compared with other studies. However, improved fallows were able to significantly decrease aboveground weed biomass. Total biomass of improved fallows increased more rapidly than that of natural fallow and cassava cropping. There were no significant soil fertility differences between treatments and all fallows increased the organic matter in topsoil over time. Available P declined in all treatments but stocks of aboveground N, P and K increased more rapidly under improved fallows. Planted fallows using trees such as I. Mulls have the potential to reduce growth of weed species and improve some soil fertility parameters but, on highly degraded soil, a longer time and possibly P fertilisation may be needed to achieve these increases.},
  author       = {Lojka, Bohdan and Preininger, Daniel and Van Damme, Patrick and Rollo, A and Banout, Jan},
  issn         = {0128-1283},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF TROPICAL FOREST SCIENCE},
  keyword      = {TROPICAL FALLOWS,NUTRIENT STOCKS,MAIZE,PRODUCTIVITY,HUMID TROPICS,Peruvian Amazon,slash and burn farming,FERTILITY,GROWTH,improved fallow,Agroforestry,Imperata brasiliensis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {89--101},
  title        = {Use of the Amazonian tree species Inga edulis for soil regeneration and weed control},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Lojka, Bohdan, Daniel Preininger, Patrick Van Damme, A Rollo, and Jan Banout. 2012. “Use of the Amazonian Tree Species Inga Edulis for Soil Regeneration and Weed Control.” Journal of Tropical Forest Science 24 (1): 89–101.
APA
Lojka, B., Preininger, D., Van Damme, P., Rollo, A., & Banout, J. (2012). Use of the Amazonian tree species Inga edulis for soil regeneration and weed control. JOURNAL OF TROPICAL FOREST SCIENCE, 24(1), 89–101.
Vancouver
1.
Lojka B, Preininger D, Van Damme P, Rollo A, Banout J. Use of the Amazonian tree species Inga edulis for soil regeneration and weed control. JOURNAL OF TROPICAL FOREST SCIENCE. 2012;24(1):89–101.
MLA
Lojka, Bohdan, Daniel Preininger, Patrick Van Damme, et al. “Use of the Amazonian Tree Species Inga Edulis for Soil Regeneration and Weed Control.” JOURNAL OF TROPICAL FOREST SCIENCE 24.1 (2012): 89–101. Print.