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Cognitive styles and person-environment fit: investigating the consequences of cognitive (mis)fit

Eva Cools, Herman Van Den Broeck UGent and Dave Bouckenooghe (2009) EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF WORK AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 18(2). p.167-198
abstract
There is currently considerable interest in the key elements of person-environment fit to understand vocational behaviour and to develop strategic human resource management practices. In the light of this interest, we wanted to investigate (1) whether people within similar functions have similar cognitive styles, and (2) what the consequences of cognitive (mis)fit are on three work attitudes, using two large-scale databases (N=24,267 and N=2,182). We identified a knowing-oriented cognitive climate in finance, information technology (IT), and research and development (RD) functions; a planning-oriented cognitive climate in administrative and technical and production functions; and a creating-oriented cognitive climate in sales and marketing functions and general management. Furthermore, we found that the relationship between people's cognitive styles and work attitudes (i.e., job satisfaction, job search behaviour, and intention to leave) does not depend on the cognitive climate in which they work. However, we did find that people with a higher creating style on average score higher on intention to leave and job search behaviour in comparison with people who score lower on the creating style, irrespective of the cognitive climate they are working in. The cognitive climate also partially affects job satisfaction and intention to leave after controlling for cognitive styles. In summary, cognitive styles and cognitive climate seem to have separate influences on people's work attitudes. Our findings are relevant for selection and recruitment policies of organizations and in the context of training, job design, and workforce planning.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
JOB SEARCH BEHAVIOR, ORGANIZATION FIT, KIRTON ADAPTION-INNOVATION, DECISION-MAKING, PSYCHOLOGICAL CLIMATE, EMPLOYED MANAGERS, DIFFERENCE SCORES, WORK, CULTURE, SATISFACTION, Cognitive styles, Cognitive Style Indicator, Person-environment fit, Work attitudes
journal title
EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF WORK AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
Eur. J. Work Organ. Psychol.
volume
18
issue
2
article_number
PII 901994817
pages
167 - 198
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000265647100003
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, APPLIED
JCR impact factor
1.467 (2009)
JCR rank
22/63 (2009)
JCR quartile
2 (2009)
ISSN
1359-432X
DOI
10.1080/13594320802295540
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
2049883
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2049883
date created
2012-02-28 17:08:03
date last changed
2015-06-17 09:58:32
@article{2049883,
  abstract     = {There is currently considerable interest in the key elements of person-environment fit to understand vocational behaviour and to develop strategic human resource management practices. In the light of this interest, we wanted to investigate (1) whether people within similar functions have similar cognitive styles, and (2) what the consequences of cognitive (mis)fit are on three work attitudes, using two large-scale databases (N=24,267 and N=2,182). We identified a knowing-oriented cognitive climate in finance, information technology (IT), and research and development (RD) functions; a planning-oriented cognitive climate in administrative and technical and production functions; and a creating-oriented cognitive climate in sales and marketing functions and general management. Furthermore, we found that the relationship between people's cognitive styles and work attitudes (i.e., job satisfaction, job search behaviour, and intention to leave) does not depend on the cognitive climate in which they work. However, we did find that people with a higher creating style on average score higher on intention to leave and job search behaviour in comparison with people who score lower on the creating style, irrespective of the cognitive climate they are working in. The cognitive climate also partially affects job satisfaction and intention to leave after controlling for cognitive styles. In summary, cognitive styles and cognitive climate seem to have separate influences on people's work attitudes. Our findings are relevant for selection and recruitment policies of organizations and in the context of training, job design, and workforce planning.},
  articleno    = {PII 901994817},
  author       = {Cools, Eva and Van Den Broeck, Herman and Bouckenooghe, Dave},
  issn         = {1359-432X},
  journal      = {EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF WORK AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY},
  keyword      = {JOB SEARCH BEHAVIOR,ORGANIZATION FIT,KIRTON ADAPTION-INNOVATION,DECISION-MAKING,PSYCHOLOGICAL CLIMATE,EMPLOYED MANAGERS,DIFFERENCE SCORES,WORK,CULTURE,SATISFACTION,Cognitive styles,Cognitive Style Indicator,Person-environment fit,Work attitudes},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {PII 901994817:167--PII 901994817:198},
  title        = {Cognitive styles and person-environment fit: investigating the consequences of cognitive (mis)fit},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13594320802295540},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Cools, Eva, Herman Van Den Broeck, and Dave Bouckenooghe. 2009. “Cognitive Styles and Person-environment Fit: Investigating the Consequences of Cognitive (mis)fit.” European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology 18 (2): 167–198.
APA
Cools, E., Van Den Broeck, H., & Bouckenooghe, D. (2009). Cognitive styles and person-environment fit: investigating the consequences of cognitive (mis)fit. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF WORK AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY, 18(2), 167–198.
Vancouver
1.
Cools E, Van Den Broeck H, Bouckenooghe D. Cognitive styles and person-environment fit: investigating the consequences of cognitive (mis)fit. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF WORK AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 2009;18(2):167–98.
MLA
Cools, Eva, Herman Van Den Broeck, and Dave Bouckenooghe. “Cognitive Styles and Person-environment Fit: Investigating the Consequences of Cognitive (mis)fit.” EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF WORK AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 18.2 (2009): 167–198. Print.