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No effect of caffeine on exercise performance in high ambient temperature

Bart Roelands, Luk Buyse, Frank Pauwels, Frans Delbeke UGent, Koen Deventer UGent and Romain Meeusen (2011) EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY. 111(12). p.3089-3095
abstract
Caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, has shown to improve performance in normal ambient temperature, presumably via an effect on dopaminergic neurotransmission through the antagonism of adenosine receptors. However, there is very limited evidence from studies that administered caffeine and examined its effects on exercise in the heat. Therefore, we wanted to study the effects of caffeine on performance and thermoregulation in high ambient temperature. Eight healthy trained male cyclists completed two experimental trials (in 30°C) in a double-blind-randomized crossover design. Subjects ingested either placebo (6 mg/kg) or caffeine (6 mg/kg) 1 h prior to exercise. Subjects cycled for 60 min at 55% W (max), immediately followed by a time trial to measure performance. The significance level was set at p < 0.05. Caffeine did not change performance (p = 0.462). Rectal temperature was significantly elevated after caffeine administration (p < 0.036). Caffeine significantly increased B-endorphin plasma concentrations at the end of the time trial (p = 0.032). The present study showed no ergogenic effect of caffeine when administered 1 h before exercise in 30°C. This confirms results from a previous study that examined the effects of caffeine administration on a short (15 min) time trial in 40°C. However, caffeine increased core temperature during exercise. Presumably, the rate of increase in core temperature may have counteracted the ergogenic effects of caffeine. However, other factors such as interindividual differences in response to caffeine and changes in neurotransmitter concentrations might also be responsible for the lack of performance improvement of caffeine in high ambient temperature.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Central fatigue, Adenosine receptor antagonism, Time trial, Exercise, Heat, REUPTAKE INHIBITION, PROLONGED EXERCISE, MUSCLE METABOLISM, BODY-TEMPERATURE, SKELETAL-MUSCLE, SPORTS DRINK, HEAT, RESPONSES, INGESTION, FATIGUE
journal title
EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY
Eur. J. Appl. Physiol.
volume
111
issue
12
pages
3089 - 3095
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000297174800021
JCR category
SPORT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
2.147 (2011)
JCR rank
18/83 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
1439-6319
DOI
10.1007/s00421-011-1945-9
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2045145
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2045145
date created
2012-02-26 21:59:26
date last changed
2012-04-04 09:52:42
@article{2045145,
  abstract     = {Caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, has shown to improve performance in normal ambient temperature, presumably via an effect on dopaminergic neurotransmission through the antagonism of adenosine receptors. However, there is very limited evidence from studies that administered caffeine and examined its effects on exercise in the heat. Therefore, we wanted to study the effects of caffeine on performance and thermoregulation in high ambient temperature. Eight healthy trained male cyclists completed two experimental trials (in 30{\textdegree}C) in a double-blind-randomized crossover design. Subjects ingested either placebo (6 mg/kg) or caffeine (6 mg/kg) 1 h prior to exercise. Subjects cycled for 60 min at 55\% W (max), immediately followed by a time trial to measure performance. The significance level was set at p {\textlangle} 0.05. Caffeine did not change performance (p = 0.462). Rectal temperature was significantly elevated after caffeine administration (p {\textlangle} 0.036). Caffeine significantly increased B-endorphin plasma concentrations at the end of the time trial (p = 0.032). The present study showed no ergogenic effect of caffeine when administered 1 h before exercise in 30{\textdegree}C. This confirms results from a previous study that examined the effects of caffeine administration on a short (15 min) time trial in 40{\textdegree}C. However, caffeine increased core temperature during exercise. Presumably, the rate of increase in core temperature may have counteracted the ergogenic effects of caffeine. However, other factors such as interindividual differences in response to caffeine and changes in neurotransmitter concentrations might also be responsible for the lack of performance improvement of caffeine in high ambient temperature.},
  author       = {Roelands, Bart and Buyse, Luk and Pauwels, Frank and Delbeke, Frans and Deventer, Koen and Meeusen, Romain},
  issn         = {1439-6319},
  journal      = {EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {Central fatigue,Adenosine receptor antagonism,Time trial,Exercise,Heat,REUPTAKE INHIBITION,PROLONGED EXERCISE,MUSCLE METABOLISM,BODY-TEMPERATURE,SKELETAL-MUSCLE,SPORTS DRINK,HEAT,RESPONSES,INGESTION,FATIGUE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {3089--3095},
  title        = {No effect of caffeine on exercise performance in high ambient temperature},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00421-011-1945-9},
  volume       = {111},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Roelands, Bart, Luk Buyse, Frank Pauwels, Frans Delbeke, Koen Deventer, and Romain Meeusen. 2011. “No Effect of Caffeine on Exercise Performance in High Ambient Temperature.” European Journal of Applied Physiology 111 (12): 3089–3095.
APA
Roelands, B., Buyse, L., Pauwels, F., Delbeke, F., Deventer, K., & Meeusen, R. (2011). No effect of caffeine on exercise performance in high ambient temperature. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY, 111(12), 3089–3095.
Vancouver
1.
Roelands B, Buyse L, Pauwels F, Delbeke F, Deventer K, Meeusen R. No effect of caffeine on exercise performance in high ambient temperature. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY. 2011;111(12):3089–95.
MLA
Roelands, Bart, Luk Buyse, Frank Pauwels, et al. “No Effect of Caffeine on Exercise Performance in High Ambient Temperature.” EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY 111.12 (2011): 3089–3095. Print.