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Beyond 'Eurocentrism'? The challenge of linguistic justice theory to translation studies

Michael Boyden (2011) TRANSLATION AND INTERPRETING STUDIES. 6(2). p.174-188
abstract
This paper deals with the recurrent criticism in Translation studies in general and Anglophone Translation studies in particular that the discipline labors under a 'Eurocentric' bias. The author develops two arguments in relation to this. First, the charge of 'Eurocentrism' serves a number ends that have less to do with an actual desire to reach out to 'non-Western' discourses on translation (although the globalization of the discipline has definitely broadened the scope and concerns of translation scholars) than with a generation gap among translation scholars. Drawing on literature from the last two decades, the author argues that 'Eurocentrism' often functions as an asymmetrical counterconcept, in Reinhardt Koselleck's sense, which allows translation scholars to legitimize their scholarly project by investing it with a sense of urgency and political relevance. In a second step, the author argues that the rhetorical debate over 'Eurocentrism' often suffers from an overextension of identity claims, whereby translation processes are reduced to either an imposition of or reaction against hegemonic power structures. This focus on identity, however legitimate, may result in linguistic paternalism. To counteract this negative effect, the author calls for a revalorization of instrumentalist justifications of language use by drawing on linguistic justice theory, arguing that, following recent insights by political philosophers and contrary to the prevalent view held by translation scholars, when it comes to determining a just translation policy, (non-linguistic) instrumental concerns tend to override (intrinsic) identity concerns.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
hegemony, linguistic justice, translation studies, asymmetrical counterconcept, PRESIDENTIAL-ADDRESS, Eurocentric
journal title
TRANSLATION AND INTERPRETING STUDIES
Trans. Interpret. Stud.
volume
6
issue
2
pages
174 - 188
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000300361600005
JCR category
LINGUISTICS
JCR impact factor
0.16 (2011)
JCR rank
126/158 (2011)
JCR quartile
4 (2011)
ISSN
1932-2798
DOI
10.1075/tis.6.2.04boy
language
English
UGent publication?
no
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2040930
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2040930
date created
2012-02-22 15:52:56
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:42:02
@article{2040930,
  abstract     = {This paper deals with the recurrent criticism in Translation studies in general and Anglophone Translation studies in particular that the discipline labors under a 'Eurocentric' bias. The author develops two arguments in relation to this. First, the charge of 'Eurocentrism' serves a number ends that have less to do with an actual desire to reach out to 'non-Western' discourses on translation (although the globalization of the discipline has definitely broadened the scope and concerns of translation scholars) than with a generation gap among translation scholars. Drawing on literature from the last two decades, the author argues that 'Eurocentrism' often functions as an asymmetrical counterconcept, in Reinhardt Koselleck's sense, which allows translation scholars to legitimize their scholarly project by investing it with a sense of urgency and political relevance. In a second step, the author argues that the rhetorical debate over 'Eurocentrism' often suffers from an overextension of identity claims, whereby translation processes are reduced to either an imposition of or reaction against hegemonic power structures. This focus on identity, however legitimate, may result in linguistic paternalism. To counteract this negative effect, the author calls for a revalorization of instrumentalist justifications of language use by drawing on linguistic justice theory, arguing that, following recent insights by political philosophers and contrary to the prevalent view held by translation scholars, when it comes to determining a just translation policy, (non-linguistic) instrumental concerns tend to override (intrinsic) identity concerns.},
  author       = {Boyden, Michael},
  issn         = {1932-2798},
  journal      = {TRANSLATION AND INTERPRETING STUDIES},
  keyword      = {hegemony,linguistic justice,translation studies,asymmetrical counterconcept,PRESIDENTIAL-ADDRESS,Eurocentric},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {174--188},
  title        = {Beyond 'Eurocentrism'? The challenge of linguistic justice theory to translation studies},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/tis.6.2.04boy},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Boyden, Michael. 2011. “Beyond ‘Eurocentrism’? The Challenge of Linguistic Justice Theory to Translation Studies.” Translation and Interpreting Studies 6 (2): 174–188.
APA
Boyden, M. (2011). Beyond “Eurocentrism”? The challenge of linguistic justice theory to translation studies. TRANSLATION AND INTERPRETING STUDIES, 6(2), 174–188.
Vancouver
1.
Boyden M. Beyond “Eurocentrism”? The challenge of linguistic justice theory to translation studies. TRANSLATION AND INTERPRETING STUDIES. 2011;6(2):174–88.
MLA
Boyden, Michael. “Beyond ‘Eurocentrism’? The Challenge of Linguistic Justice Theory to Translation Studies.” TRANSLATION AND INTERPRETING STUDIES 6.2 (2011): 174–188. Print.