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Plasma serotonin and surgical small intestinal colic in horses

Sara Torfs (UGent) , An Maes (UGent) , Catherine Delesalle (UGent) , Siska Croubels (UGent) and Piet Deprez (UGent)
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Abstract
Introduction: Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) is an important signaling molecule in the body and a major regulator of gastrointestinal motility. It is released in increased quantities in several conditions, including intestinal ischemia-reperfusion and platelet activation. In surgical colic cases, changes in free plasma serotonin could hypothetically contribute to the development of equine postoperative ileus. Therefore plasma serotonin concentrations were compared in healthy horses and horses undergoing laparotomy for small intestinal colic. Materials and Methods: a total of 164 EDTA plasma samples were collected from 24 control horses and 34 colic horses. Samples from the colic horses were collected at admission, immediately after surgery and at least the first morning postoperatively. Platelet stabilizing agents aspirin (1 mM), clomipramine (1 µM) and phenelzine (10 µM) were added and samples were centrifuged to produce platelet poor plasma. Serotonin concentrations were determined with a validated liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method (LC-MS/MS). Serotonin differences were analyzed using logistic regression. Results: Small intestinal surgical colic cases had significantly lower plasma serotonin concentrations than healthy horses (n = 55; p < 0.001; OR 0.96; 95% CI 0.94-0.98) at admission, with a trend towards lower concentrations postoperatively (n = 55; p = 0.08) and the next morning (n = 55; p = 0.08). Within the group of colic horses, there was no difference in plasma serotonin at admission between horses that developed ileus and horses with a normal intestinal recovery (n = 27; p = 0.91), nor between horses that survived to discharge and non-survivors (n = 31; p = 0.89). Conclusions: Plasma serotonin concentrations were lower in surgical small intestinal colic horses. There was no relation to development of ileus or postoperative survival. Variable results have been published concerning serotonin values in healthy and diseased horses. More studies using standardized sampling protocols and reliable measurement methods are needed.
Keywords
colic, serotonin, horse, ELISA, LC-MS/MS

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Chicago
Torfs, Sara, An Maes, Catherine Delesalle, Siska Croubels, and Piet Deprez. 2012. “Plasma Serotonin and Surgical Small Intestinal Colic in Horses.” In European Veterinary Conference : Voorjaarsdagen, Abstracts, 295–296.
APA
Torfs, S., Maes, A., Delesalle, C., Croubels, S., & Deprez, P. (2012). Plasma serotonin and surgical small intestinal colic in horses. European Veterinary Conference : Voorjaarsdagen, Abstracts (pp. 295–296). Presented at the 2012 European Veterinary Conference : Voorjaarsdagen.
Vancouver
1.
Torfs S, Maes A, Delesalle C, Croubels S, Deprez P. Plasma serotonin and surgical small intestinal colic in horses. European Veterinary Conference : Voorjaarsdagen, Abstracts. 2012. p. 295–6.
MLA
Torfs, Sara, An Maes, Catherine Delesalle, et al. “Plasma Serotonin and Surgical Small Intestinal Colic in Horses.” European Veterinary Conference : Voorjaarsdagen, Abstracts. 2012. 295–296. Print.
@inproceedings{2039089,
  abstract     = {Introduction: Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) is an important signaling molecule in the body and a major regulator of gastrointestinal motility. It is released in increased quantities in several conditions, including intestinal ischemia-reperfusion and platelet activation. In surgical colic cases, changes in free plasma serotonin could hypothetically contribute to the development of equine postoperative ileus. Therefore plasma serotonin concentrations were compared in healthy horses and horses undergoing laparotomy for small intestinal colic.
Materials and Methods: a total of 164 EDTA plasma samples were collected from 24 control horses and 34 colic horses. Samples from the colic horses were collected at admission, immediately after surgery and at least the first morning postoperatively. Platelet stabilizing agents aspirin (1 mM), clomipramine (1 {\textmu}M) and phenelzine (10 {\textmu}M) were added and samples were centrifuged to produce platelet poor plasma. Serotonin concentrations were determined with a validated liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method (LC-MS/MS). Serotonin differences were analyzed using logistic regression.
Results: Small intestinal surgical colic cases had significantly lower plasma serotonin concentrations than healthy horses (n = 55; p {\textlangle} 0.001; OR 0.96; 95\% CI 0.94-0.98) at admission, with a trend towards lower concentrations postoperatively (n = 55; p = 0.08) and the next morning (n = 55; p = 0.08). Within the group of colic horses, there was no difference in plasma serotonin at admission between horses that developed ileus and horses with a normal intestinal recovery (n = 27; p = 0.91), nor between horses that survived to discharge and non-survivors (n = 31; p = 0.89). 
Conclusions: Plasma serotonin concentrations were lower in surgical small intestinal colic horses. There was no relation to development of ileus or postoperative survival. Variable results have been published concerning serotonin values in healthy and diseased horses. More studies using standardized sampling protocols and reliable measurement methods are needed.},
  author       = {Torfs, Sara and Maes, An and Delesalle, Catherine and Croubels, Siska and Deprez, Piet},
  booktitle    = {European Veterinary Conference : Voorjaarsdagen, Abstracts},
  keyword      = {colic,serotonin,horse,ELISA,LC-MS/MS},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Amsterdam, The Netherlands},
  pages        = {295--296},
  title        = {Plasma serotonin and surgical small intestinal colic in horses},
  year         = {2012},
}