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Assessment of the importance of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium for the terrestrial nitrogen cycle

T Rütting, Pascal Boeckx UGent, C Müller and L Klemedtsson (2011) BIOGEOSCIENCES. 8(7). p.1779-1791
abstract
The nitrogen (N) cycle contains two different processes of dissimilatory nitrate (NO(3)(-)) reduction, denitrification and dissimilatory NO(3)(-) reduction to ammonium (DNRA). While there is general agreement that the denitrification process takes place in many soils, the occurrence and importance of DNRA is generally not considered. Two approaches have been used to investigate DNRA in soil, (1) microbiological techniques to identify soil microorganisms capable of DNRA and (2) (15)N tracing to elucidate the occurrence of DNRA and to quantify gross DNRA rates. There is evidence that many soil bacteria and fungi have the ability to perform DNRA. Redox status and C/NO(3)(-) ratio have been identified as the most important factors regulating DNRA in soil. (15)N tracing studies have shown that gross DNRA rates can be a significant or even a dominant NO(3)(-) consumption process in some ecosystems. Moreover, a link between heterotrophic nitrification and DNRA provides an alternative pathway of ammonium (NH(4)(+)) production to mineralisation. Numerical (15)N tracing models are particularly useful when investigating DNRA in the context of other N cycling processes. The results of correlation and regression analyses show that highest gross DNRA rates can be expected in soils with high organic matter content in humid regions, while its relative importance is higher in temperate climates. With this review we summarise the importance and current knowledge of this often overlooked NO(3)(-) consumption process within the terrestrial N cycle. We strongly encourage considering DNRA as a relevant process in future soil N cycling investigations.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
NITRITE REDUCTION, RETENTION PROCESSES, DENITRIFYING BACTERIA, GRASSLAND SOIL, HUMID TROPICAL FOREST, CHILEAN NOTHOFAGUS FOREST, ATMOSPHERIC CARBON-DIOXIDE, OXIDE PRODUCTION, SHORT-CIRCUIT, ELEVATED CO2
journal title
BIOGEOSCIENCES
Biogeosciences
volume
8
issue
7
pages
1779 - 1791
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000294153700003
JCR category
GEOSCIENCES, MULTIDISCIPLINARY
JCR impact factor
3.859 (2011)
JCR rank
8/170 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
1726-4170
DOI
10.5194/bg-8-1779-2011
project
Biotechnology for a sustainable economy (Bio-Economy)
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
2037937
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2037937
date created
2012-02-17 16:39:19
date last changed
2018-02-23 15:26:39
@article{2037937,
  abstract     = {The nitrogen (N) cycle contains two different processes of dissimilatory nitrate (NO(3)(-)) reduction, denitrification and dissimilatory NO(3)(-) reduction to ammonium (DNRA). While there is general agreement that the denitrification process takes place in many soils, the occurrence and importance of DNRA is generally not considered. Two approaches have been used to investigate DNRA in soil, (1) microbiological techniques to identify soil microorganisms capable of DNRA and (2) (15)N tracing to elucidate the occurrence of DNRA and to quantify gross DNRA rates. There is evidence that many soil bacteria and fungi have the ability to perform DNRA. Redox status and C/NO(3)(-) ratio have been identified as the most important factors regulating DNRA in soil. (15)N tracing studies have shown that gross DNRA rates can be a significant or even a dominant NO(3)(-) consumption process in some ecosystems. Moreover, a link between heterotrophic nitrification and DNRA provides an alternative pathway of ammonium (NH(4)(+)) production to mineralisation. Numerical (15)N tracing models are particularly useful when investigating DNRA in the context of other N cycling processes. The results of correlation and regression analyses show that highest gross DNRA rates can be expected in soils with high organic matter content in humid regions, while its relative importance is higher in temperate climates. With this review we summarise the importance and current knowledge of this often overlooked NO(3)(-) consumption process within the terrestrial N cycle. We strongly encourage considering DNRA as a relevant process in future soil N cycling investigations.},
  author       = {R{\"u}tting, T and Boeckx, Pascal and M{\"u}ller, C and Klemedtsson, L},
  issn         = {1726-4170},
  journal      = {BIOGEOSCIENCES},
  keyword      = {NITRITE REDUCTION,RETENTION PROCESSES,DENITRIFYING BACTERIA,GRASSLAND SOIL,HUMID TROPICAL FOREST,CHILEAN NOTHOFAGUS FOREST,ATMOSPHERIC CARBON-DIOXIDE,OXIDE PRODUCTION,SHORT-CIRCUIT,ELEVATED CO2},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1779--1791},
  title        = {Assessment of the importance of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium for the terrestrial nitrogen cycle},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/bg-8-1779-2011},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Rütting, T, Pascal Boeckx, C Müller, and L Klemedtsson. 2011. “Assessment of the Importance of Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction to Ammonium for the Terrestrial Nitrogen Cycle.” Biogeosciences 8 (7): 1779–1791.
APA
Rütting, T, Boeckx, P., Müller, C., & Klemedtsson, L. (2011). Assessment of the importance of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium for the terrestrial nitrogen cycle. BIOGEOSCIENCES, 8(7), 1779–1791.
Vancouver
1.
Rütting T, Boeckx P, Müller C, Klemedtsson L. Assessment of the importance of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium for the terrestrial nitrogen cycle. BIOGEOSCIENCES. 2011;8(7):1779–91.
MLA
Rütting, T, Pascal Boeckx, C Müller, et al. “Assessment of the Importance of Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction to Ammonium for the Terrestrial Nitrogen Cycle.” BIOGEOSCIENCES 8.7 (2011): 1779–1791. Print.