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Fetal microchimeric cells in blood and thyroid glands of women with an autoimmune thyroid disease

Trees Lepez UGent, Mado Vandewoestyne UGent and Dieter Deforce UGent (2012) CHIMERISM. 3(1). p.21-23
abstract
Persistence of fetal microchimeric cells may result in the development of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) such as Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) or Graves disease (GD). In women, HT and GD show an increased incidence in the years following parturition. Although fetal cells have already been shown to be more common in the thyroid glands of patients with an AITD compared with controls, these cells haven’t been described in blood of these patients. Our study detected fetal cells in blood of all patients with an AITD. Moreover, fetal cells were immune cells potentially capable of initiating a graft vs. host reaction and suggest a potential role of these cells in the pathogenesis of AITD. Our study indicates the value and need for further research in this field.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Autoimmune thyroid disease, Graves' disease, FISH, real-time PCR
journal title
CHIMERISM
Chimerism
volume
3
issue
1
pages
21 - 23
ISSN
1938-1956
DOI
10.4161/chim.19615
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A2
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2034014
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2034014
date created
2012-02-15 14:33:49
date last changed
2013-06-12 09:03:32
@article{2034014,
  abstract     = {Persistence of fetal microchimeric cells may result in the development of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) such as Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) or Graves disease (GD). In women, HT and GD show an increased incidence in the years following parturition. Although fetal cells have already been shown to be more common in the thyroid glands of patients with an AITD compared with controls, these cells haven{\textquoteright}t been described in blood of these patients. Our study detected fetal cells in blood of all patients with an AITD. Moreover, fetal cells were immune cells potentially capable of initiating a graft vs. host reaction and suggest a potential role of these cells in the pathogenesis of AITD. Our study indicates the value and need for further research in this field.},
  author       = {Lepez, Trees and Vandewoestyne, Mado and Deforce, Dieter},
  issn         = {1938-1956},
  journal      = {CHIMERISM},
  keyword      = {Hashimoto's thyroiditis,Autoimmune thyroid disease,Graves' disease,FISH,real-time PCR},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {21--23},
  title        = {Fetal microchimeric cells in blood and thyroid glands of women with an autoimmune thyroid disease},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4161/chim.19615},
  volume       = {3},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Lepez, Trees, Mado Vandewoestyne, and Dieter Deforce. 2012. “Fetal Microchimeric Cells in Blood and Thyroid Glands of Women with an Autoimmune Thyroid Disease.” Chimerism 3 (1): 21–23.
APA
Lepez, T., Vandewoestyne, M., & Deforce, D. (2012). Fetal microchimeric cells in blood and thyroid glands of women with an autoimmune thyroid disease. CHIMERISM, 3(1), 21–23.
Vancouver
1.
Lepez T, Vandewoestyne M, Deforce D. Fetal microchimeric cells in blood and thyroid glands of women with an autoimmune thyroid disease. CHIMERISM. 2012;3(1):21–3.
MLA
Lepez, Trees, Mado Vandewoestyne, and Dieter Deforce. “Fetal Microchimeric Cells in Blood and Thyroid Glands of Women with an Autoimmune Thyroid Disease.” CHIMERISM 3.1 (2012): 21–23. Print.