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Jane Austen fan fiction and the situated fantext: the example of Pamela Aidan's Fitzwilliam darcy, gentleman

(2011) ENGLISH TEXT CONSTRUCTION. 4(2). p.165-185
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Abstract
Building on recent findings in the field of fan fiction studies, I claim that Pamela Aidan’s Fitzwilliam Darcy, Gentleman is indirectly influenced by three cultural phenomena which centre around Jane Austen and her work. Aidan’s fan fiction text stays close to the spirit of Austen’s Pride and Prejudice because she “reimagines” the novel according to the interpretive conventions of the Republic of Pemberley, a fan community. These conventions demand respect for Austen and her novels because they are shaped by the broader, cultural conventions of Janeitism and Austen criticism. Similarly, Aidan’s text is more individualistic and “Harlequinesque” than Austen’s novel, because the Republic allows writers to reproduce the cultural reading which underlies BBC / A&E’s adaptation of Austen’s novel.
Keywords
fan fiction, Jane Austen, cultural context, fantext

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Chicago
Van Steenhuyse, Veerle. 2011. “Jane Austen Fan Fiction and the Situated Fantext: The Example of Pamela Aidan’s Fitzwilliam Darcy, Gentleman.” English Text Construction 4 (2): 165–185.
APA
Van Steenhuyse, V. (2011). Jane Austen fan fiction and the situated fantext: the example of Pamela Aidan’s Fitzwilliam darcy, gentleman. ENGLISH TEXT CONSTRUCTION, 4(2), 165–185.
Vancouver
1.
Van Steenhuyse V. Jane Austen fan fiction and the situated fantext: the example of Pamela Aidan’s Fitzwilliam darcy, gentleman. ENGLISH TEXT CONSTRUCTION. 2011;4(2):165–85.
MLA
Van Steenhuyse, Veerle. “Jane Austen Fan Fiction and the Situated Fantext: The Example of Pamela Aidan’s Fitzwilliam Darcy, Gentleman.” ENGLISH TEXT CONSTRUCTION 4.2 (2011): 165–185. Print.
@article{2032836,
  abstract     = {Building on recent findings in the field of fan fiction studies, I claim that Pamela Aidan{\textquoteright}s Fitzwilliam Darcy, Gentleman is indirectly influenced by three cultural phenomena which centre around Jane Austen and her work. Aidan{\textquoteright}s fan fiction text stays close to the spirit of Austen{\textquoteright}s Pride and Prejudice because she {\textquotedblleft}reimagines{\textquotedblright} the novel according to the interpretive conventions of the Republic of Pemberley, a fan community. These conventions demand respect for Austen and her novels because they are shaped by the broader, cultural conventions of Janeitism and Austen criticism. Similarly, Aidan{\textquoteright}s text is more individualistic and {\textquotedblleft}Harlequinesque{\textquotedblright} than Austen{\textquoteright}s novel, because the Republic allows writers to reproduce the cultural reading which underlies BBC / A\&E{\textquoteright}s adaptation of Austen{\textquoteright}s novel.},
  articleno    = {1},
  author       = {Van Steenhuyse, Veerle},
  issn         = {1874-8767},
  journal      = {ENGLISH TEXT CONSTRUCTION},
  keyword      = {fan fiction,Jane Austen,cultural context,fantext},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {1:165--1:185},
  title        = {Jane Austen fan fiction and the situated fantext: the example of Pamela Aidan's Fitzwilliam darcy, gentleman},
  volume       = {4},
  year         = {2011},
}