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Clinical results after high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer

VALERIE FONTEYNE UGent, Nicolaas Lumen UGent, Geert Villeirs UGent, Piet Ost UGent and Gert De Meerleer UGent (2012) ADVANCES IN UROLOGY. 2012.
abstract
Purpose. Patients with high-risk prostate cancer (PC) can be treated with high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and long-term androgen deprivation (AD). In this paper we report on (i) late toxicity and (ii) biochemical (bRFS) and clinical relapse-free survival (cRFS) of this combined treatment. Methods. 126 patients with high-risk PC (T3-4 or PSA >20 ng/mL or Gleason 8-10) and ≥24 months of followup were treated with high-dose IMRT and AD. Late toxicity was recorded. Biochemical relapse was defined as PSA nadir +2 ng/mL. Clinical relapse was defined as local failure or metastases. Results. The incidence of late grade 3 gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity was 2 and 6%, respectively. Five-year bRFS and cRFS were 73% and 86% respectively. AD was a significant predictor of bRFS (P = 0.001) and cRFS (P = 0.01). Conclusion. High-dose IMRT and AD for high-risk PC offers excellent biochemical and clinical control with low toxicity.
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author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
journal title
ADVANCES IN UROLOGY
Adv. Urol.
volume
2012
article_number
368528
pages
8 pages
ISSN
0894-4385
DOI
10.1155/2012/368528
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A2
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
2028781
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2028781
date created
2012-02-13 17:09:23
date last changed
2012-03-02 10:41:01
@article{2028781,
  abstract     = {Purpose. Patients with high-risk prostate cancer (PC) can be treated with high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and long-term androgen deprivation (AD). In this paper we report on (i) late toxicity and (ii) biochemical (bRFS) and clinical relapse-free survival (cRFS) of this combined treatment. Methods. 126 patients with high-risk PC (T3-4 or PSA {\textrangle}20\,ng/mL or Gleason 8-10) and \ensuremath{\geq}24 months of followup were treated with high-dose IMRT and AD. Late toxicity was recorded. Biochemical relapse was defined as PSA nadir +2\,ng/mL. Clinical relapse was defined as local failure or metastases. Results. The incidence of late grade 3 gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity was 2 and 6\%, respectively. Five-year bRFS and cRFS were 73\% and 86\% respectively. AD was a significant predictor of bRFS (P = 0.001) and cRFS (P = 0.01). Conclusion. High-dose IMRT and AD for high-risk PC offers excellent biochemical and clinical control with low toxicity.},
  articleno    = {368528},
  author       = {FONTEYNE, VALERIE and Lumen, Nicolaas and Villeirs, Geert and Ost, Piet and De Meerleer, Gert},
  issn         = {0894-4385},
  journal      = {ADVANCES IN UROLOGY},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {8},
  title        = {Clinical results after high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/368528},
  volume       = {2012},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Fonteyne, Valérie, Nicolaas Lumen, Geert Villeirs, Piet Ost, and Gert De Meerleer. 2012. “Clinical Results After High-dose Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy for High-risk Prostate Cancer.” Advances in Urology 2012.
APA
Fonteyne, Valérie, Lumen, N., Villeirs, G., Ost, P., & De Meerleer, G. (2012). Clinical results after high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer. ADVANCES IN UROLOGY, 2012.
Vancouver
1.
Fonteyne V, Lumen N, Villeirs G, Ost P, De Meerleer G. Clinical results after high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer. ADVANCES IN UROLOGY. 2012;2012.
MLA
Fonteyne, Valérie, Nicolaas Lumen, Geert Villeirs, et al. “Clinical Results After High-dose Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy for High-risk Prostate Cancer.” ADVANCES IN UROLOGY 2012 (2012): n. pag. Print.