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On the need for randomised trials of therapeutic community approaches

Steve Pearce and Annemarie Autrique UGent (2010) THERAPEUTIC COMMUNITIES. 31(4). p.338-355
abstract
Evidence-based practice is repeatedly emphasised in mental health care. However, a number of objections have been raised in response to calls to carry out randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in therapeutic community (TC) settings. In the context of an increasing emphasis on particular kinds of evidence to demonstrate the usefulness of health care interventions, a meeting of experts was convened in Oxford, UK, in 2008 to examine the question of whether such studies were desirable and possible. Taking these discussions as its starting point, this paper examines the objections to carrying out a randomised trial of TC treatment, and describes how a randomised controlled trial of health TCs for personality disorder currently underway in Oxford has addressed them. The Oxfordshire Complex Needs Service is an intensive treatment service for people suffering from personality disorders and similar conditions. The paper presents details of how the RCT was developed, and demonstrates that it is possible to address the major concerns in the design of RCTs.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
personality disorders, therapeutic communities, evidence-based practice, randomised controlled trials
journal title
THERAPEUTIC COMMUNITIES
Ther. communities
volume
31
issue
4
pages
338 - 355
ISSN
0964-1866
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A2
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
VABB id
c:vabb:321985
VABB type
VABB-1
id
2028304
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2028304
date created
2012-02-13 13:55:10
date last changed
2015-06-17 09:57:04
@article{2028304,
  abstract     = {Evidence-based practice is repeatedly emphasised in mental health care. However, a number of objections have been raised in response to calls to carry out randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in therapeutic community (TC) settings. In the context of an increasing emphasis on particular kinds of evidence to demonstrate the usefulness of health care interventions, a meeting of experts was convened in Oxford, UK, in 2008 to examine the question of whether such studies were desirable and possible. Taking these discussions as its starting point, this paper examines the objections to carrying out a randomised trial of TC treatment, and describes how a randomised controlled trial of health TCs for personality disorder currently underway in Oxford has addressed them. The Oxfordshire Complex Needs Service is an intensive treatment service for people suffering from personality disorders and similar conditions. The paper presents details of how the RCT was developed, and demonstrates that it is possible to address the major concerns in the design of RCTs.},
  author       = {Pearce, Steve and Autrique, Annemarie},
  issn         = {0964-1866},
  journal      = {THERAPEUTIC COMMUNITIES},
  keyword      = {personality disorders,therapeutic communities,evidence-based practice,randomised controlled trials},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {338--355},
  title        = {On the need for randomised trials of therapeutic community approaches},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Pearce, Steve, and Annemarie Autrique. 2010. “On the Need for Randomised Trials of Therapeutic Community Approaches.” Therapeutic Communities 31 (4): 338–355.
APA
Pearce, S., & Autrique, A. (2010). On the need for randomised trials of therapeutic community approaches. THERAPEUTIC COMMUNITIES, 31(4), 338–355.
Vancouver
1.
Pearce S, Autrique A. On the need for randomised trials of therapeutic community approaches. THERAPEUTIC COMMUNITIES. 2010;31(4):338–55.
MLA
Pearce, Steve, and Annemarie Autrique. “On the Need for Randomised Trials of Therapeutic Community Approaches.” THERAPEUTIC COMMUNITIES 31.4 (2010): 338–355. Print.