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Effects of invasive parasites on bumble bee declines

Ivan Meeus UGent, Mark JF Brown, Dirk de Graaf UGent and Guy Smagghe UGent (2011) CONSERVATION BIOLOGY. 25(4). p.662-671
abstract
Bumble bees are a group of pollinators that are both ecologically and economically important and declining worldwide. Numerous mechanisms could be behind this decline, and the spread of parasites from commercial colonies into wild populations has been implicated recently in North America. Commercial breeding may lead to declines because commercial colonies may have high parasite loads, which can lead to colonization of native bumble bee populations; commercial rearing may allow higher parasite virulence to evolve; and global movement of commercial colonies may disrupt spatial patterns in local adaptation between hosts and parasites. We assessed parasite virulence, transmission mode, and infectivity. Microparasites and so-called honey bee viruses may pose the greatest threat to native bumble bee populations because certain risk factors are present; for example, the probability of horizontal transmission of the trypanosome parasite Crithidia bombi is high. The microsporidian parasite Nosema bombi may play a role in declines of bumble bees in the United States. Preliminary indications that C. bombi and the neogregarine Apicystis bombi may not be native in parts of South America. We suggest that the development of molecular screening protocols, thorough sanitation efforts, and cooperation among nongovernmental organizations, governments, and commercial breeders might immediately mitigate these threats.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
pathogen spillover, protozoan parasites, commercial rearing, Bombus, viruses, CRITHIDIA-BOMBI TRYPANOSOMATIDAE, EMERGING INFECTIOUS-DISEASES, CROP POLLINATION SERVICES, COLONY COLLAPSE DISORDER, NOSEMA-BOMBI, WORLDWIDE MIGRATION, EUROPEAN BUMBLEBEE, AETHINA-TUMIDA, HOST-PARASITE, PATHOGEN
journal title
CONSERVATION BIOLOGY
Conserv. Biol.
volume
25
issue
4
pages
662 - 671
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000292907500002
JCR category
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
4.692 (2011)
JCR rank
15/203 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
0888-8892
DOI
10.1111/j.1523-1739.2011.01707.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2021087
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2021087
date created
2012-02-06 16:35:24
date last changed
2012-02-22 13:12:23
@article{2021087,
  abstract     = {Bumble bees are a group of pollinators that are both ecologically and economically important and declining worldwide. Numerous mechanisms could be behind this decline, and the spread of parasites from commercial colonies into wild populations has been implicated recently in North America. Commercial breeding may lead to declines because commercial colonies may have high parasite loads, which can lead to colonization of native bumble bee populations; commercial rearing may allow higher parasite virulence to evolve; and global movement of commercial colonies may disrupt spatial patterns in local adaptation between hosts and parasites. We assessed parasite virulence, transmission mode, and infectivity. Microparasites and so-called honey bee viruses may pose the greatest threat to native bumble bee populations because certain risk factors are present; for example, the probability of horizontal transmission of the trypanosome parasite Crithidia bombi is high. The microsporidian parasite Nosema bombi may play a role in declines of bumble bees in the United States. Preliminary indications that C. bombi and the neogregarine Apicystis bombi may not be native in parts of South America. We suggest that the development of molecular screening protocols, thorough sanitation efforts, and cooperation among nongovernmental organizations, governments, and commercial breeders might immediately mitigate these threats.},
  author       = {Meeus, Ivan and Brown, Mark JF and de Graaf, Dirk and Smagghe, Guy},
  issn         = {0888-8892},
  journal      = {CONSERVATION BIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {pathogen spillover,protozoan parasites,commercial rearing,Bombus,viruses,CRITHIDIA-BOMBI TRYPANOSOMATIDAE,EMERGING INFECTIOUS-DISEASES,CROP POLLINATION SERVICES,COLONY COLLAPSE DISORDER,NOSEMA-BOMBI,WORLDWIDE MIGRATION,EUROPEAN BUMBLEBEE,AETHINA-TUMIDA,HOST-PARASITE,PATHOGEN},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {662--671},
  title        = {Effects of invasive parasites on bumble bee declines},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1523-1739.2011.01707.x},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Meeus, Ivan, Mark JF Brown, Dirk de Graaf, and Guy Smagghe. 2011. “Effects of Invasive Parasites on Bumble Bee Declines.” Conservation Biology 25 (4): 662–671.
APA
Meeus, I., Brown, M. J., de Graaf, D., & Smagghe, G. (2011). Effects of invasive parasites on bumble bee declines. CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, 25(4), 662–671.
Vancouver
1.
Meeus I, Brown MJ, de Graaf D, Smagghe G. Effects of invasive parasites on bumble bee declines. CONSERVATION BIOLOGY. 2011;25(4):662–71.
MLA
Meeus, Ivan, Mark JF Brown, Dirk de Graaf, et al. “Effects of Invasive Parasites on Bumble Bee Declines.” CONSERVATION BIOLOGY 25.4 (2011): 662–671. Print.