Advanced search
1 file | 164.37 KB

The Newtonian refutation of Spinoza: Newton's challenge and the socratic problem

Eric Schliesser (UGent)
Author
Organization
Project
De metafysica en wiskunde van botsingen
Abstract
In this chapter I discuss the philosophic and historical significance of Colin MacLaurin’s attacks on Spinoza’s metaphysics in his posthumously published, An Account of Sir Isaac Newton’s Philosophical Discoveries (1748/1968; hereafter Account). The main point of the chapter is to illustrate how the Socratic Problem and Newton’s Challenge are debated at the start of the eighteenth century. Recognizing the importance and nature of these debates can help us both to understand the partial origin of some canonical versions of our philosophical history and, if we wish, to correct them in favor of more revealing ones. Finally, the mere existence ofMacLaurin’s treatment undermines a widely accepted historiographic myth that members of the Scottish Enlightenment (Hume, Adam Smith, Reid, etc.) only knew and thought of Spinoza through Bayle’s treatment.
Keywords
Spinoza, Colin MacLaurin, Hume, Newton

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 164.37 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Schliesser, Eric. 2012. “The Newtonian Refutation of Spinoza: Newton’s Challenge and the Socratic Problem.” In Interpreting Newton : Critical Essays, ed. Andrew Janiak and Eric Schliesser, 299–319. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
APA
Schliesser, E. (2012). The Newtonian refutation of Spinoza: Newton’s challenge and the socratic problem. In A. Janiak & E. Schliesser (Eds.), Interpreting Newton : critical essays (pp. 299–319). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
Vancouver
1.
Schliesser E. The Newtonian refutation of Spinoza: Newton’s challenge and the socratic problem. In: Janiak A, Schliesser E, editors. Interpreting Newton : critical essays. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press; 2012. p. 299–319.
MLA
Schliesser, Eric. “The Newtonian Refutation of Spinoza: Newton’s Challenge and the Socratic Problem.” Interpreting Newton : Critical Essays. Ed. Andrew Janiak & Eric Schliesser. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2012. 299–319. Print.
@incollection{2020240,
  abstract     = {In this chapter I discuss the philosophic and historical significance of Colin MacLaurin{\textquoteright}s attacks on Spinoza{\textquoteright}s metaphysics in his posthumously published, An Account of Sir Isaac Newton{\textquoteright}s Philosophical Discoveries (1748/1968; hereafter Account). The main point of the chapter is to illustrate how the Socratic Problem and Newton{\textquoteright}s Challenge are debated at the start of the eighteenth century. Recognizing the importance and nature of these debates can help us both to understand the partial origin of some canonical versions of our philosophical history and, if we wish, to correct them in favor of more revealing ones. Finally, the mere existence ofMacLaurin{\textquoteright}s treatment undermines a widely accepted historiographic myth that members of the Scottish Enlightenment (Hume, Adam Smith, Reid, etc.) only knew and thought of Spinoza through Bayle{\textquoteright}s treatment.},
  author       = {Schliesser, Eric},
  booktitle    = {Interpreting Newton : critical essays},
  editor       = {Janiak, Andrew and Schliesser, Eric},
  isbn         = {9780521766180},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {299--319},
  publisher    = {Cambridge University Press},
  title        = {The Newtonian refutation of Spinoza: Newton's challenge and the socratic problem},
  year         = {2012},
}