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Economic implications of three strategies for the control of taeniasis

Anu Alexander, KR John, T Jayaraman, Anna Oommen, M Venkata Raghava, Pierre Dorny UGent and Vedatam Rajshekhar (2011) TROPICAL MEDICINE & INTERNATIONAL HEALTH. 16(11). p.1410-1416
abstract
OBJECTIVE To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of three strategies for the control of taeniasis in a community, in terms of cost per case treated. METHODS A study was conducted in South India to determine the prevalence of taeniasis by screening stool samples from 653 randomly chosen subjects, for coproantigens. The costs incurred in the project were used to estimate the cost per case screened and treated. A one-way sensitivity analysis was carried out for varying rates of taeniasis, different screening strategies and mass therapy. Further sensitivity analysis was carried out with different manpower and test costs. RESULTS The rate of taeniasis as detected by ELISA for coproantigen was 3 per 1000 (2 of 653 samples). Our study showed that mass therapy without screening for taeniasis would be the most economical strategy in terms of cost per case treated if field workers are employed exclusively for either mass therapy or screening. For each strategy, costs per case treated are higher at low prevalence of taeniasis, with a sharp rise below 15%. CONCLUSIONS In places that are endemic for taeniasis and neurocysticercosis, mass therapy or screening for taeniasis should be considered. Screening by stool microscopy is not cost-effective in terms of cost per case of taeniasis treated owing to its low sensitivity. Although the cost per case of taeniasis treated is high at low prevalence of taeniasis for all options, incorporating mass therapy into existing mass drug distribution programmes might prove to be the most cost-effective control strategy.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
HUMAN CYSTICERCOSIS, RURAL VILLAGE, SOLIUM TAENIASIS, costs, mass therapy, screening, taeniasis, INDIA, PREVALENCE, NEUROCYSTICERCOSIS, INFECTION, ANTIGENS, EPILEPSY, HUMANS
journal title
TROPICAL MEDICINE & INTERNATIONAL HEALTH
Trop. Med. Int. Health
volume
16
issue
11
pages
1410 - 1416
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000295837600009
JCR category
TROPICAL MEDICINE
JCR impact factor
2.795 (2011)
JCR rank
3/20 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
1360-2276
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-3156.2011.02850.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2000623
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2000623
date created
2012-01-24 09:51:21
date last changed
2012-01-31 10:03:54
@article{2000623,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of three strategies for the control of taeniasis in a community, in terms of cost per case treated. 
METHODS A study was conducted in South India to determine the prevalence of taeniasis by screening stool samples from 653 randomly chosen subjects, for coproantigens. The costs incurred in the project were used to estimate the cost per case screened and treated. A one-way sensitivity analysis was carried out for varying rates of taeniasis, different screening strategies and mass therapy. Further sensitivity analysis was carried out with different manpower and test costs. 
RESULTS The rate of taeniasis as detected by ELISA for coproantigen was 3 per 1000 (2 of 653 samples). Our study showed that mass therapy without screening for taeniasis would be the most economical strategy in terms of cost per case treated if field workers are employed exclusively for either mass therapy or screening. For each strategy, costs per case treated are higher at low prevalence of taeniasis, with a sharp rise below 15\%. 
CONCLUSIONS In places that are endemic for taeniasis and neurocysticercosis, mass therapy or screening for taeniasis should be considered. Screening by stool microscopy is not cost-effective in terms of cost per case of taeniasis treated owing to its low sensitivity. Although the cost per case of taeniasis treated is high at low prevalence of taeniasis for all options, incorporating mass therapy into existing mass drug distribution programmes might prove to be the most cost-effective control strategy.},
  author       = {Alexander, Anu and John, KR and Jayaraman, T and Oommen, Anna and Raghava, M Venkata and Dorny, Pierre and Rajshekhar, Vedatam},
  issn         = {1360-2276},
  journal      = {TROPICAL MEDICINE \& INTERNATIONAL HEALTH},
  keyword      = {HUMAN CYSTICERCOSIS,RURAL VILLAGE,SOLIUM TAENIASIS,costs,mass therapy,screening,taeniasis,INDIA,PREVALENCE,NEUROCYSTICERCOSIS,INFECTION,ANTIGENS,EPILEPSY,HUMANS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1410--1416},
  title        = {Economic implications of three strategies for the control of taeniasis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3156.2011.02850.x},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Alexander, Anu, KR John, T Jayaraman, Anna Oommen, M Venkata Raghava, Pierre Dorny, and Vedatam Rajshekhar. 2011. “Economic Implications of Three Strategies for the Control of Taeniasis.” Tropical Medicine & International Health 16 (11): 1410–1416.
APA
Alexander, Anu, John, K., Jayaraman, T., Oommen, A., Raghava, M. V., Dorny, P., & Rajshekhar, V. (2011). Economic implications of three strategies for the control of taeniasis. TROPICAL MEDICINE & INTERNATIONAL HEALTH, 16(11), 1410–1416.
Vancouver
1.
Alexander A, John K, Jayaraman T, Oommen A, Raghava MV, Dorny P, et al. Economic implications of three strategies for the control of taeniasis. TROPICAL MEDICINE & INTERNATIONAL HEALTH. 2011;16(11):1410–6.
MLA
Alexander, Anu, KR John, T Jayaraman, et al. “Economic Implications of Three Strategies for the Control of Taeniasis.” TROPICAL MEDICINE & INTERNATIONAL HEALTH 16.11 (2011): 1410–1416. Print.