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Combinatorial biosynthesis in plants: a (p)review on its potential and future exploitation

Jacob Pollier (UGent) , Tessa Moses (UGent) and Alain Goossens (UGent)
(2011) NATURAL PRODUCT REPORTS. 28(12). p.1897-1916
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Abstract
Combinatorial biochemistry, also called combinatorial biosynthesis, comprises a series of methods that establish novel enzyme-substrate combinations in vivo and, in turn, lead to the biosynthesis of new, natural product-derived compounds that can be used in drug discovery programs. Plants are an extremely rich source of bioactive natural products and continue to possess a huge potential for drug discovery. In this review, we discuss the state-of-the-art in combinatorial biosynthesis methods to generate novel molecules from plants. We debate on the progress and potential in biotransformation, mutasynthesis, combinatorial metabolism in hybrids, activation of silent plant metabolism and synthetic biology in plants to create opportunities for the combinatorial biosynthesis of plant-derived natural products, and, ultimately, for drug discovery. The therapeutic value of two classes of natural products, the terpenoid indole alkaloids and the triterpene saponins, is particularly highlighted.
Keywords
DRUG DISCOVERY, CATHARANTHUS-ROSEUS, ST SEGMENT ELEVATION, EUCALYPTUS-PERRINIANA, ALKALOID BIOSYNTHESIS, DAUCUS-CAROTA, NATURAL-PRODUCTS, CELL-SUSPENSION-CULTURES, LEGUME MEDICAGO-TRUNCATULA, HAIRY ROOT CULTURES

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Chicago
Pollier, Jacob, Tessa Moses, and Alain Goossens. 2011. “Combinatorial Biosynthesis in Plants: a (p)review on Its Potential and Future Exploitation.” Natural Product Reports 28 (12): 1897–1916.
APA
Pollier, J., Moses, T., & Goossens, A. (2011). Combinatorial biosynthesis in plants: a (p)review on its potential and future exploitation. NATURAL PRODUCT REPORTS, 28(12), 1897–1916.
Vancouver
1.
Pollier J, Moses T, Goossens A. Combinatorial biosynthesis in plants: a (p)review on its potential and future exploitation. NATURAL PRODUCT REPORTS. 2011;28(12):1897–916.
MLA
Pollier, Jacob, Tessa Moses, and Alain Goossens. “Combinatorial Biosynthesis in Plants: a (p)review on Its Potential and Future Exploitation.” NATURAL PRODUCT REPORTS 28.12 (2011): 1897–1916. Print.
@article{1993759,
  abstract     = {Combinatorial biochemistry, also called combinatorial biosynthesis, comprises a series of methods that establish novel enzyme-substrate combinations in vivo and, in turn, lead to the biosynthesis of new, natural product-derived compounds that can be used in drug discovery programs. Plants are an extremely rich source of bioactive natural products and continue to possess a huge potential for drug discovery. In this review, we discuss the state-of-the-art in combinatorial biosynthesis methods to generate novel molecules from plants. We debate on the progress and potential in biotransformation, mutasynthesis, combinatorial metabolism in hybrids, activation of silent plant metabolism and synthetic biology in plants to create opportunities for the combinatorial biosynthesis of plant-derived natural products, and, ultimately, for drug discovery. The therapeutic value of two classes of natural products, the terpenoid indole alkaloids and the triterpene saponins, is particularly highlighted.},
  author       = {Pollier, Jacob and Moses, Tessa and Goossens, Alain},
  issn         = {0265-0568},
  journal      = {NATURAL PRODUCT REPORTS},
  keyword      = {DRUG DISCOVERY,CATHARANTHUS-ROSEUS,ST SEGMENT ELEVATION,EUCALYPTUS-PERRINIANA,ALKALOID BIOSYNTHESIS,DAUCUS-CAROTA,NATURAL-PRODUCTS,CELL-SUSPENSION-CULTURES,LEGUME MEDICAGO-TRUNCATULA,HAIRY ROOT CULTURES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {1897--1916},
  title        = {Combinatorial biosynthesis in plants: a (p)review on its potential and future exploitation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c1np00049g},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2011},
}

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