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Institutional imperatives versus emergent dynamics: a case study on continuous change in higher education

Yasar Kondakci and Herman Van Den Broeck UGent (2009) HIGHER EDUCATION. 58(4). p.439-464
abstract
This qualitative case study examines continuous change in a higher education organization (HEO). Both real time and retrospective data covering a 6-year period of the case were collected. The findings suggest that, in order to meet institutional imperatives the HEO defined several managerial and academic domains when the internationalization process was launched. When organizational members activate these domains they confronted with local needs, problems, and opportunities, which enable them to modify, update or extend the defined domains. In addition, throughout time the members constantly realize the missing parts and incorporate them into the process. These findings suggest several insights on the adaptability of higher education organizations.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
ORGANIZATIONAL-CHANGE, STRATEGIC CHANGE, TRANSFORMATION, GLOBALIZATION, PERFORMANCE, ROUTINES, SYSTEMS, POWER, MODEL, Continuous change, Higher education management, Organizational learning
journal title
HIGHER EDUCATION
High. Educ.
volume
58
issue
4
pages
439 - 464
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000268744800001
JCR category
EDUCATION & EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH
JCR impact factor
0.856 (2009)
JCR rank
56/139 (2009)
JCR quartile
2 (2009)
ISSN
0018-1560
DOI
10.1007/s10734-009-9204-2
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1993281
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1993281
date created
2012-01-18 14:33:24
date last changed
2015-06-17 09:54:32
@article{1993281,
  abstract     = {This qualitative case study examines continuous change in a higher education organization (HEO). Both real time and retrospective data covering a 6-year period of the case were collected. The findings suggest that, in order to meet institutional imperatives the HEO defined several managerial and academic domains when the internationalization process was launched. When organizational members activate these domains they confronted with local needs, problems, and opportunities, which enable them to modify, update or extend the defined domains. In addition, throughout time the members constantly realize the missing parts and incorporate them into the process. These findings suggest several insights on the adaptability of higher education organizations.},
  author       = {Kondakci, Yasar and Van Den Broeck, Herman},
  issn         = {0018-1560},
  journal      = {HIGHER EDUCATION},
  keyword      = {ORGANIZATIONAL-CHANGE,STRATEGIC CHANGE,TRANSFORMATION,GLOBALIZATION,PERFORMANCE,ROUTINES,SYSTEMS,POWER,MODEL,Continuous change,Higher education management,Organizational learning},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {439--464},
  title        = {Institutional imperatives versus emergent dynamics: a case study on continuous change in higher education},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10734-009-9204-2},
  volume       = {58},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Kondakci, Yasar, and Herman Van Den Broeck. 2009. “Institutional Imperatives Versus Emergent Dynamics: a Case Study on Continuous Change in Higher Education.” Higher Education 58 (4): 439–464.
APA
Kondakci, Y., & Van Den Broeck, H. (2009). Institutional imperatives versus emergent dynamics: a case study on continuous change in higher education. HIGHER EDUCATION, 58(4), 439–464.
Vancouver
1.
Kondakci Y, Van Den Broeck H. Institutional imperatives versus emergent dynamics: a case study on continuous change in higher education. HIGHER EDUCATION. 2009;58(4):439–64.
MLA
Kondakci, Yasar, and Herman Van Den Broeck. “Institutional Imperatives Versus Emergent Dynamics: a Case Study on Continuous Change in Higher Education.” HIGHER EDUCATION 58.4 (2009): 439–464. Print.