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The development of the five mini-theories of self-determination theory: an historical overview, emerging trends, and future directions

Maarten Vansteenkiste UGent, Christopher P Niemiec and Bart Soenens UGent (2010) The decade ahead : theoretical perspectives on motivation and achievement. In Advances in motivation and achievement 16A. p.105-166
abstract
Self-determination theory is a macro-theory of human motivation, emotion, and personality that has been under development for 40 years following the seminal work of Edward Deci and Richard Ryan. Self-determination theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 1985b, 2000; Niemiec, Ryan, & Deci, in press; Ryan & Deci, 2000; Vansteenkiste, Ryan, & Deci, 2008) has been advanced in a cumulative, research-driven manner, as new ideas have been naturally and steadily integrated into the theory following sufficient empirical support, which has helped SDT maintain its internal consistency. To use a metaphor, the development of SDT is similar to the construction of a puzzle. Over the years, new pieces have been added to the theory once their fit was determined. At present, dozens of scholars throughout the world continue to add their piece to the ‘‘SDT puzzle,’’ and hundreds of practitioners working with all age groups, and in various domains and cultures, have used SDT to inform their practice. Herein, we provide an historical overview of the development of the five mini-theories (viz., cognitive evaluation theory, organismic integration theory, causality orientations theory, basic needs theory, and goal content theory) that constitute SDT, discuss emerging trends within those mini-theories, elucidate similarities with and differences from other theoretical frameworks, and suggest directions for future research
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
bookChapter
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Self-determination Theory
book title
The decade ahead : theoretical perspectives on motivation and achievement
editor
Timothy C Urdan and Stuart A Karabenick
series title
Advances in motivation and achievement
volume
16A
pages
105 - 166
publisher
Emerald
place of publication
Bingley, UK
ISSN
0749-7423
ISBN
9780857241115
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
B2
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
VABB id
c:vabb:321533
VABB type
VABB-4
id
1993190
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1993190
date created
2012-01-18 13:49:37
date last changed
2017-01-02 09:54:41
@incollection{1993190,
  abstract     = {Self-determination theory is a macro-theory of human motivation, emotion, and personality that has been under development for 40 years following the seminal work of Edward Deci and Richard Ryan. Self-determination theory (SDT; Deci \& Ryan, 1985b, 2000; Niemiec, Ryan, \& Deci, in press; Ryan \& Deci, 2000; Vansteenkiste, Ryan, \& Deci, 2008) has been advanced in a cumulative, research-driven manner, as new ideas have been naturally and steadily integrated into the theory following sufficient empirical support, which has helped SDT maintain its internal consistency. To use a metaphor, the development of SDT is similar to the construction of a puzzle. Over the years, new pieces have been added to the theory once their fit was determined. At present, dozens of scholars throughout the world continue to add their piece to the {\textquoteleft}{\textquoteleft}SDT puzzle,{\textquoteright}{\textquoteright} and hundreds of practitioners working with all age groups, and in various domains and cultures, have used SDT to inform their practice. Herein, we provide an historical overview of the development of the five mini-theories (viz., cognitive evaluation theory, organismic integration theory, causality orientations theory, basic needs theory, and goal content theory) that constitute SDT, discuss emerging trends within those mini-theories, elucidate similarities with and differences from other theoretical frameworks, and suggest directions for future research},
  author       = {Vansteenkiste, Maarten and Niemiec, Christopher P and Soenens, Bart},
  booktitle    = {The decade ahead : theoretical perspectives on motivation and achievement},
  editor       = {Urdan, Timothy C and Karabenick , Stuart A},
  isbn         = {9780857241115},
  issn         = {0749-7423},
  keyword      = {Self-determination Theory},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {105--166},
  publisher    = {Emerald},
  series       = {Advances in motivation and achievement},
  title        = {The development of the five mini-theories of self-determination theory: an historical overview, emerging trends, and future directions},
  volume       = {16A},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Vansteenkiste, Maarten, Christopher P Niemiec, and Bart Soenens. 2010. “The Development of the Five Mini-theories of Self-determination Theory: An Historical Overview, Emerging Trends, and Future Directions.” In The Decade Ahead : Theoretical Perspectives on Motivation and Achievement, ed. Timothy C Urdan and Stuart A Karabenick , 16A:105–166. Bingley, UK: Emerald.
APA
Vansteenkiste, Maarten, Niemiec, C. P., & Soenens, B. (2010). The development of the five mini-theories of self-determination theory: an historical overview, emerging trends, and future directions. In T. C. Urdan & S. A. Karabenick (Eds.), The decade ahead : theoretical perspectives on motivation and achievement (Vol. 16A, pp. 105–166). Bingley, UK: Emerald.
Vancouver
1.
Vansteenkiste M, Niemiec CP, Soenens B. The development of the five mini-theories of self-determination theory: an historical overview, emerging trends, and future directions. In: Urdan TC, Karabenick SA, editors. The decade ahead : theoretical perspectives on motivation and achievement. Bingley, UK: Emerald; 2010. p. 105–66.
MLA
Vansteenkiste, Maarten, Christopher P Niemiec, and Bart Soenens. “The Development of the Five Mini-theories of Self-determination Theory: An Historical Overview, Emerging Trends, and Future Directions.” The Decade Ahead : Theoretical Perspectives on Motivation and Achievement. Ed. Timothy C Urdan & Stuart A Karabenick . Vol. 16A. Bingley, UK: Emerald, 2010. 105–166. Print.