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Temperature effects on forest herbs assessed by warming and transplant experiments along a latitudinal gradient

Pieter De Frenne UGent, Jörg Brunet, Anna Shevtsova, Annette Kolb, Bente J Graae, Olivier Chabrerie, Sara AO Cousins, Guillaume Decocq, An De Schrijver UGent and Martin Diekmann, et al. (2011) GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY. 17(10). p.3240-3253
abstract
Slow-colonizing forest understorey plants are probably not able to rapidly adjust their distribution range following large-scale climate change. Therefore, the acclimation potential to climate change within their actual occupied habitats will likely be key for their short-and long-term persistence. We combined transplant experiments along a latitudinal gradient with open-top chambers to assess the effects of temperature on phenology, growth and reproductive performance of multiple populations of slow-colonizing understorey plants, using the spring flowering geophytic forb Anemone nemorosa and the early summer flowering grass Milium effusum as study species. In both species, emergence time and start of flowering clearly advanced with increasing temperatures. Vegetative growth (plant height, aboveground biomass) and reproductive success (seed mass, seed germination and germinable seed output) of A. nemorosa benefited from higher temperatures. Climate warming may thus increase future competitive ability and colonization rates of this species. Apart from the effects on phenology, growth and reproductive performance of M. effusum generally decreased when transplanted southwards (e. g., plant size and number of individuals decreased towards the south) and was probably more limited by light availability in the south. Specific leaf area of both species increased when transplanted southwards, but decreased with open-top chamber installation in A. nemorosa. In general, individuals of both species transplanted at the home site performed best, suggesting local adaptation. We conclude that contrasting understorey plants may display divergent plasticity in response to changing temperatures which may alter future understorey community dynamics.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
common garden experiment, climate change, forest understorey, latitude, local adaptation, open-top chambers, phenotypic plasticity, pot experiment, ANEMONE-NEMOROSA L, OPEN-TOP CHAMBERS, MILIUM-EFFUSUM L, CLIMATE-CHANGE, VASCULAR PLANTS, SEED DISPERSAL, REPRODUCTIVE PHENOLOGY, HABITAT FRAGMENTATION, DECIDUOUS FOREST, LOCAL ADAPTATION
journal title
GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY
Glob. Change Biol.
volume
17
issue
10
pages
3240 - 3253
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000294571700019
JCR category
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
6.862 (2011)
JCR rank
5/203 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
1354-1013
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2486.2011.02449.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1989816
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1989816
date created
2012-01-17 14:08:43
date last changed
2012-01-20 11:22:02
@article{1989816,
  abstract     = {Slow-colonizing forest understorey plants are probably not able to rapidly adjust their distribution range following large-scale climate change. Therefore, the acclimation potential to climate change within their actual occupied habitats will likely be key for their short-and long-term persistence. We combined transplant experiments along a latitudinal gradient with open-top chambers to assess the effects of temperature on phenology, growth and reproductive performance of multiple populations of slow-colonizing understorey plants, using the spring flowering geophytic forb Anemone nemorosa and the early summer flowering grass Milium effusum as study species. In both species, emergence time and start of flowering clearly advanced with increasing temperatures. Vegetative growth (plant height, aboveground biomass) and reproductive success (seed mass, seed germination and germinable seed output) of A. nemorosa benefited from higher temperatures. Climate warming may thus increase future competitive ability and colonization rates of this species. Apart from the effects on phenology, growth and reproductive performance of M. effusum generally decreased when transplanted southwards (e. g., plant size and number of individuals decreased towards the south) and was probably more limited by light availability in the south. Specific leaf area of both species increased when transplanted southwards, but decreased with open-top chamber installation in A. nemorosa. In general, individuals of both species transplanted at the home site performed best, suggesting local adaptation. We conclude that contrasting understorey plants may display divergent plasticity in response to changing temperatures which may alter future understorey community dynamics.},
  author       = {De Frenne, Pieter and Brunet, J{\"o}rg and Shevtsova, Anna and Kolb, Annette and Graae, Bente J and Chabrerie, Olivier and Cousins, Sara AO and Decocq, Guillaume and De Schrijver, An and Diekmann, Martin and Gruwez, Robert and Heinken, Thilo and Hermy, Martin and Nilsson, Christer and Stanton, Sharon and Tack, Wesley and Willaert, Justin and Verheyen, Kris},
  issn         = {1354-1013},
  journal      = {GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {common garden experiment,climate change,forest understorey,latitude,local adaptation,open-top chambers,phenotypic plasticity,pot experiment,ANEMONE-NEMOROSA L,OPEN-TOP CHAMBERS,MILIUM-EFFUSUM L,CLIMATE-CHANGE,VASCULAR PLANTS,SEED DISPERSAL,REPRODUCTIVE PHENOLOGY,HABITAT FRAGMENTATION,DECIDUOUS FOREST,LOCAL ADAPTATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {3240--3253},
  title        = {Temperature effects on forest herbs assessed by warming and transplant experiments along a latitudinal gradient},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2486.2011.02449.x},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
De Frenne, Pieter, Jörg Brunet, Anna Shevtsova, Annette Kolb, Bente J Graae, Olivier Chabrerie, Sara AO Cousins, et al. 2011. “Temperature Effects on Forest Herbs Assessed by Warming and Transplant Experiments Along a Latitudinal Gradient.” Global Change Biology 17 (10): 3240–3253.
APA
De Frenne, P., Brunet, J., Shevtsova, A., Kolb, A., Graae, B. J., Chabrerie, O., Cousins, S. A., et al. (2011). Temperature effects on forest herbs assessed by warming and transplant experiments along a latitudinal gradient. GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY, 17(10), 3240–3253.
Vancouver
1.
De Frenne P, Brunet J, Shevtsova A, Kolb A, Graae BJ, Chabrerie O, et al. Temperature effects on forest herbs assessed by warming and transplant experiments along a latitudinal gradient. GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY. 2011;17(10):3240–53.
MLA
De Frenne, Pieter, Jörg Brunet, Anna Shevtsova, et al. “Temperature Effects on Forest Herbs Assessed by Warming and Transplant Experiments Along a Latitudinal Gradient.” GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY 17.10 (2011): 3240–3253. Print.