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Comparison of cross-sectional anatomy and computed tomography of the tarsus in horses

Els Raes UGent, Eric HJ Bergman, Henk van der Veen, Katrien Vanderperren UGent, Elke Van der Vekens UGent and Jimmy Saunders UGent (2011) AMERICAN JOURNAL OF VETERINARY RESEARCH. 72(9). p.1209-1221
abstract
Objective-To compare computed tomography (CT) images of equine tarsi with cross-sectional anatomic slices and evaluate the potential of CT for imaging pathological tarsal changes in horses. Sample-6 anatomically normal equine cadaveric hind limbs and 4 tarsi with pathological changes. Procedures-Precontrast CT was performed on 3 equine tarsi; sagittal and dorsal reconstructions were made. In all limbs, postcontrast CT was performed after intra-articular contrast medium injection of the tarsocrural, centrodistal, and tarsometatarsal joints, Images were matched with corresponding anatomic slices. Four tarsi with pathological changes underwent CT examination. Results-The tibia, talus, calcaneus, and central, fused first and second, third, and fourth tarsal bones were clearly visualized as well as the long digital extensor, superficial digital flexor, lateral digital flexor (with tarsal flexor retinaculum), gastrocnemius, peroneus tertius, and tibialis cranialis tendons and the long plantar ligament. The lateral digital extensor, medial digital flexor, split peroneus tertius, and tibialis cranialis tendons and collateral ligaments could be located but not always clearly identified. Some small tarsal ligaments were identifiable, including plantar, medial, interosseus, and lateral talocalcaneal ligaments; interosseus talocentral, centrodistal, and tarsometatarsal ligaments; proximal and distal plantar ligaments; and talometatarsal ligament. Parts of the articular cartilage could be assessed on postcontrast images. Lesions were detected in the 4 tarsi with pathological changes. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-CT of the tarsus is recommended when radiography and ultrasonography are inconclusive and during preoperative planning for treatment of complex fractures. Images from this study can serve as a CT reference, and CT of pathological changes was useful.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
EQUINE TARSUS, TARSOCRURAL JOINT, SUBCHONDRAL BONE THICKNESS, RESONANCE IMAGES, CARTILAGE, EXERCISE, LAMENESS, FRACTURE, PATTERN, LESIONS
journal title
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF VETERINARY RESEARCH
Am. J. Vet. Res.
volume
72
issue
9
pages
1209 - 1221
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000294510000009
JCR category
VETERINARY SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
1.269 (2011)
JCR rank
39/141 (2011)
JCR quartile
2 (2011)
ISSN
0002-9645
DOI
10.2460/ajvr.72.9.1209
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1989595
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1989595
date created
2012-01-17 13:07:28
date last changed
2015-06-17 09:54:23
@article{1989595,
  abstract     = {Objective-To compare computed tomography (CT) images of equine tarsi with cross-sectional anatomic slices and evaluate the potential of CT for imaging pathological tarsal changes in horses. 
Sample-6 anatomically normal equine cadaveric hind limbs and 4 tarsi with pathological changes. 
Procedures-Precontrast CT was performed on 3 equine tarsi; sagittal and dorsal reconstructions were made. In all limbs, postcontrast CT was performed after intra-articular contrast medium injection of the tarsocrural, centrodistal, and tarsometatarsal joints, Images were matched with corresponding anatomic slices. Four tarsi with pathological changes underwent CT examination. 
Results-The tibia, talus, calcaneus, and central, fused first and second, third, and fourth tarsal bones were clearly visualized as well as the long digital extensor, superficial digital flexor, lateral digital flexor (with tarsal flexor retinaculum), gastrocnemius, peroneus tertius, and tibialis cranialis tendons and the long plantar ligament. The lateral digital extensor, medial digital flexor, split peroneus tertius, and tibialis cranialis tendons and collateral ligaments could be located but not always clearly identified. Some small tarsal ligaments were identifiable, including plantar, medial, interosseus, and lateral talocalcaneal ligaments; interosseus talocentral, centrodistal, and tarsometatarsal ligaments; proximal and distal plantar ligaments; and talometatarsal ligament. Parts of the articular cartilage could be assessed on postcontrast images. Lesions were detected in the 4 tarsi with pathological changes. 
Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-CT of the tarsus is recommended when radiography and ultrasonography are inconclusive and during preoperative planning for treatment of complex fractures. Images from this study can serve as a CT reference, and CT of pathological changes was useful.},
  author       = {Raes, Els and Bergman, Eric HJ and van der Veen, Henk and Vanderperren, Katrien and Van der Vekens, Elke and Saunders, Jimmy},
  issn         = {0002-9645},
  journal      = {AMERICAN JOURNAL OF VETERINARY RESEARCH},
  keyword      = {EQUINE TARSUS,TARSOCRURAL JOINT,SUBCHONDRAL BONE THICKNESS,RESONANCE IMAGES,CARTILAGE,EXERCISE,LAMENESS,FRACTURE,PATTERN,LESIONS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1209--1221},
  title        = {Comparison of cross-sectional anatomy and computed tomography of the tarsus in horses},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2460/ajvr.72.9.1209},
  volume       = {72},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Raes, Els, Eric HJ Bergman, Henk van der Veen, Katrien Vanderperren, Elke Van der Vekens, and Jimmy Saunders. 2011. “Comparison of Cross-sectional Anatomy and Computed Tomography of the Tarsus in Horses.” American Journal of Veterinary Research 72 (9): 1209–1221.
APA
Raes, Els, Bergman, E. H., van der Veen, H., Vanderperren, K., Van der Vekens, E., & Saunders, J. (2011). Comparison of cross-sectional anatomy and computed tomography of the tarsus in horses. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF VETERINARY RESEARCH, 72(9), 1209–1221.
Vancouver
1.
Raes E, Bergman EH, van der Veen H, Vanderperren K, Van der Vekens E, Saunders J. Comparison of cross-sectional anatomy and computed tomography of the tarsus in horses. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF VETERINARY RESEARCH. 2011;72(9):1209–21.
MLA
Raes, Els, Eric HJ Bergman, Henk van der Veen, et al. “Comparison of Cross-sectional Anatomy and Computed Tomography of the Tarsus in Horses.” AMERICAN JOURNAL OF VETERINARY RESEARCH 72.9 (2011): 1209–1221. Print.