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What's in God's name: literary forerunners and philosophical allies of the Imiaslavie-debate

Nel Grillaert UGent (2012) STUDIES IN EAST EUROPEAN THOUGHT. 64(3-4). p.163-181
abstract
The aim of this paper is to explore the interaction between a tradition that belongs originally to the realm of orthodox contemplative monasticism (i.e., hesychasm) and nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Russian intellectuals. In the first part, this paper will explore how hesychasm gradually penetrated nineteenth-century secular culture; a special focus will be on the hermitage of Optina Pustyn' and its renowned elders, as well as their appeal to members of the Optina-intelligentsia, especially FA << dor Dostoevskij. Then, attention will shift to the imjaslavie controversy at the beginning of the twentieth century, which flared up initially as a dispute between Athonite monks and reached a sad culmination in 1912-1913 with a manu militari intervention by troops of the Russian Holy Synod. However, the debate was taken up by some prominent intellectuals of the Russian religious renaissance, such as Pavel Florenskij, Nikolaj Berdjaev, and Sergej Bulgakov, who explicitly sided with the imjaslavcy ("Glorifiers of the Name") and actively stepped into the debate.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Imjaslavie, Religious philosophers, Optina-intelligentsia, Elderhood, Hesychasm
journal title
STUDIES IN EAST EUROPEAN THOUGHT
Stud. East Eur. Thought
volume
64
issue
3-4
pages
163 - 181
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000312064500002
JCR category
ETHICS
JCR impact factor
0.06 (2012)
JCR rank
46/48 (2012)
JCR quartile
4 (2012)
ISSN
0925-9392
DOI
10.1007/s11212-012-9167-1
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1989347
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1989347
date created
2012-01-17 12:08:27
date last changed
2015-06-17 09:54:22
@article{1989347,
  abstract     = {The aim of this paper is to explore the interaction between a tradition that belongs originally to the realm of orthodox contemplative monasticism (i.e., hesychasm) and nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Russian intellectuals. In the first part, this paper will explore how hesychasm gradually penetrated nineteenth-century secular culture; a special focus will be on the hermitage of Optina Pustyn' and its renowned elders, as well as their appeal to members of the Optina-intelligentsia, especially FA {\textlangle}{\textlangle} dor Dostoevskij. Then, attention will shift to the imjaslavie controversy at the beginning of the twentieth century, which flared up initially as a dispute between Athonite monks and reached a sad culmination in 1912-1913 with a manu militari intervention by troops of the Russian Holy Synod. However, the debate was taken up by some prominent intellectuals of the Russian religious renaissance, such as Pavel Florenskij, Nikolaj Berdjaev, and Sergej Bulgakov, who explicitly sided with the imjaslavcy ({\textacutedbl}Glorifiers of the Name{\textacutedbl}) and actively stepped into the debate.},
  author       = {Grillaert, Nel},
  issn         = {0925-9392},
  journal      = {STUDIES IN EAST EUROPEAN THOUGHT},
  keyword      = {Imjaslavie,Religious philosophers,Optina-intelligentsia,Elderhood,Hesychasm},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3-4},
  pages        = {163--181},
  title        = {What's in God's name: literary forerunners and philosophical allies of the Imiaslavie-debate},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11212-012-9167-1},
  volume       = {64},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Grillaert, Nel. 2012. “What’s in God's Name: Literary Forerunners and Philosophical Allies of the Imiaslavie-debate.” Studies in East European Thought 64 (3-4): 163–181.
APA
Grillaert, N. (2012). What’s in God's name: literary forerunners and philosophical allies of the Imiaslavie-debate. STUDIES IN EAST EUROPEAN THOUGHT, 64(3-4), 163–181.
Vancouver
1.
Grillaert N. What’s in God's name: literary forerunners and philosophical allies of the Imiaslavie-debate. STUDIES IN EAST EUROPEAN THOUGHT. 2012;64(3-4):163–81.
MLA
Grillaert, Nel. “What’s in God's Name: Literary Forerunners and Philosophical Allies of the Imiaslavie-debate.” STUDIES IN EAST EUROPEAN THOUGHT 64.3-4 (2012): 163–181. Print.