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The role of stimulus salience and attentional capture across the neural hierarchy in a stop-signal task

Nico Böhler UGent, Lawrence G Appelbaum, Ruth Krebs UGent, Ling-Chia Chen and Marty G Woldorff (2011) PLOS ONE. 6(10).
abstract
Inhibitory motor control is a core function of cognitive control. Evidence from diverse experimental approaches has linked this function to a mostly right-lateralized network of cortical and subcortical areas, wherein a signal from the frontal cortex to the basal ganglia is believed to trigger motor-response cancellation. Recently, however, it has been recognized that in the context of typical motor-control paradigms those processes related to actual response inhibition and those related to the attentional processing of the relevant stimuli are highly interrelated and thus difficult to distinguish. Here, we used fMRI and a modified Stop-signal task to specifically examine the role of perceptual and attentional processes triggered by the different stimuli in such tasks, thus seeking to further distinguish other cognitive processes that may precede or otherwise accompany the implementation of response inhibition. In order to establish which brain areas respond to sensory stimulation differences by rare Stop-stimuli, as well as to the associated attentional capture that these may trigger irrespective of their task-relevance, we compared brain activity evoked by Stop-trials to that evoked by Go-trials in task blocks where Stop-stimuli were to be ignored. In addition, region-of-interest analyses comparing the responses to these task-irrelevant Stop-trials, with those to typical relevant Stop-trials, identified separable activity profiles as a function of the task-relevance of the Stop-signal. While occipital areas were mostly blind to the task-relevance of Stop-stimuli, activity in temporo-parietal areas dissociated between task-irrelevant and task-relevant ones. Activity profiles in frontal areas, in turn, were activated mainly by task-relevant Stop-trials, presumably reflecting a combination of triggered top-down attentional influences and inhibitory motor-control processes.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
INFERIOR FRONTAL GYRUS, EVENT-RELATED FMRI, RESPONSE-INHIBITION, COGNITIVE CONTROL, DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER, FRONTOPARIETAL NETWORK, ANTERIOR INSULA, FUNCTIONAL MRI, PERFORMANCE, CORTEX
journal title
PLOS ONE
PLoS One
volume
6
issue
10
article number
e26386
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000295984400053
JCR category
BIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
4.092 (2011)
JCR rank
12/84 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
1932-6203
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0026386
project
The integrative neuroscience of behavioral control (Neuroscience)
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1985718
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1985718
date created
2012-01-13 11:32:58
date last changed
2016-12-21 15:42:24
@article{1985718,
  abstract     = {Inhibitory motor control is a core function of cognitive control. Evidence from diverse experimental approaches has linked this function to a mostly right-lateralized network of cortical and subcortical areas, wherein a signal from the frontal cortex to the basal ganglia is believed to trigger motor-response cancellation. Recently, however, it has been recognized that in the context of typical motor-control paradigms those processes related to actual response inhibition and those related to the attentional processing of the relevant stimuli are highly interrelated and thus difficult to distinguish. Here, we used fMRI and a modified Stop-signal task to specifically examine the role of perceptual and attentional processes triggered by the different stimuli in such tasks, thus seeking to further distinguish other cognitive processes that may precede or otherwise accompany the implementation of response inhibition. In order to establish which brain areas respond to sensory stimulation differences by rare Stop-stimuli, as well as to the associated attentional capture that these may trigger irrespective of their task-relevance, we compared brain activity evoked by Stop-trials to that evoked by Go-trials in task blocks where Stop-stimuli were to be ignored. In addition, region-of-interest analyses comparing the responses to these task-irrelevant Stop-trials, with those to typical relevant Stop-trials, identified separable activity profiles as a function of the task-relevance of the Stop-signal. While occipital areas were mostly blind to the task-relevance of Stop-stimuli, activity in temporo-parietal areas dissociated between task-irrelevant and task-relevant ones. Activity profiles in frontal areas, in turn, were activated mainly by task-relevant Stop-trials, presumably reflecting a combination of triggered top-down attentional influences and inhibitory motor-control processes.},
  articleno    = {e26386},
  author       = {B{\"o}hler, Nico and Appelbaum, Lawrence G and Krebs, Ruth and Chen, Ling-Chia and Woldorff, Marty G},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  journal      = {PLOS ONE},
  keyword      = {INFERIOR FRONTAL GYRUS,EVENT-RELATED FMRI,RESPONSE-INHIBITION,COGNITIVE CONTROL,DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER,FRONTOPARIETAL NETWORK,ANTERIOR INSULA,FUNCTIONAL MRI,PERFORMANCE,CORTEX},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  title        = {The role of stimulus salience and attentional capture across the neural hierarchy in a stop-signal task},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0026386},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Böhler, Nico, Lawrence G Appelbaum, Ruth Krebs, Ling-Chia Chen, and Marty G Woldorff. 2011. “The Role of Stimulus Salience and Attentional Capture Across the Neural Hierarchy in a Stop-signal Task.” Plos One 6 (10).
APA
Böhler, N., Appelbaum, L. G., Krebs, R., Chen, L.-C., & Woldorff, M. G. (2011). The role of stimulus salience and attentional capture across the neural hierarchy in a stop-signal task. PLOS ONE, 6(10).
Vancouver
1.
Böhler N, Appelbaum LG, Krebs R, Chen L-C, Woldorff MG. The role of stimulus salience and attentional capture across the neural hierarchy in a stop-signal task. PLOS ONE. 2011;6(10).
MLA
Böhler, Nico, Lawrence G Appelbaum, Ruth Krebs, et al. “The Role of Stimulus Salience and Attentional Capture Across the Neural Hierarchy in a Stop-signal Task.” PLOS ONE 6.10 (2011): n. pag. Print.