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Magnetic resonace–based attenuation correction for micro–single-photon emission computed tomography

Vincent Keereman UGent, Yves Fierens, Christian Vanhove UGent, Tony Lahoutte and Stefaan Vandenberghe UGent (2012) MOLECULAR IMAGING. 11(2). p.155-165
abstract
Attenuation correction is necessary for quantification in micro–single-photon emission computed tomography (micro-SPECT). In general, this is done based on micro–computed tomographic (micro-CT) images. Derivation of the attenuation map from magnetic resonance (MR) images is difficult because bone and lung are invisible in conventional MR images and hence indistinguishable from air. An ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence yields signal in bone and lungs. Micro-SPECT, micro-CT, and MR images of 18 rats were acquired. Different tracers were used: hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (brain), dimercaptosuccinic acid (kidney), colloids (liver and spleen), and macroaggregated albumin (lung). The micro-SPECT images were reconstructed without attenuation correction, with micro-CT-based attenuation maps, and with three MR-based attenuation maps: uniform, non-UTE-MR based (air, soft tissue), and UTE-MR based (air, lung, soft tissue, bone). The average difference with the micro-CT-based reconstruction was calculated. The UTEMR-based attenuation correction performed best, with average errors # 8% in the brain scans and # 3% in the body scans. It yields nonsignificant differences for the body scans. The uniform map yields errors of # 6% in the body scans. No attenuation correction yields errors $ 15% in the brain scans and $ 25% in the body scans. Attenuation correction should always be performed for quantification. The feasibility of MR-based attenuation correction was shown. When accurate quantification is necessary, a UTE-MRbased attenuation correction should be used.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
SUBSETS EXPECTATION MAXIMIZATION, PINHOLE SPECT, CT, PET/MRI, PHANTOM, QUANTIFICATION, RECONSTRUCTION, COEFFICIENTS, ACCURACY, IMAGES
journal title
MOLECULAR IMAGING
Mol. Imaging
volume
11
issue
2
pages
155 - 165
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000307645900007
JCR category
RADIOLOGY, NUCLEAR MEDICINE & MEDICAL IMAGING
JCR impact factor
3.408 (2012)
JCR rank
21/119 (2012)
JCR quartile
1 (2012)
ISSN
1535-3508
DOI
10.2310/7290.2011.00036
project
Ghent researchers on unfolded proteins in inflammatory disease (GROUP-ID)
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1984784
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1984784
date created
2012-01-12 14:30:52
date last changed
2013-04-11 13:49:25
@article{1984784,
  abstract     = {Attenuation correction is necessary for quantification in micro--single-photon emission computed tomography (micro-SPECT). In general, this is done based on micro--computed tomographic (micro-CT) images. Derivation of the attenuation map from magnetic resonance (MR) images is difficult because bone and lung are invisible in conventional MR images and hence indistinguishable from air. An ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence yields signal in bone and lungs. Micro-SPECT, micro-CT, and MR images of 18 rats were acquired. Different tracers were used: hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (brain), dimercaptosuccinic acid (kidney), colloids (liver and spleen), and macroaggregated albumin (lung). The micro-SPECT images were reconstructed without attenuation correction, with micro-CT-based attenuation maps, and with three MR-based attenuation maps: uniform, non-UTE-MR based (air, soft tissue), and UTE-MR based (air, lung, soft tissue, bone). The average difference with the micro-CT-based reconstruction was calculated. The UTEMR-based attenuation correction performed best, with average errors \# 8\% in the brain scans and \# 3\% in the body scans. It yields nonsignificant differences for the body scans. The uniform map yields errors of \# 6\% in the body scans. No attenuation correction yields errors \$ 15\% in the brain scans and \$ 25\% in the body scans. Attenuation correction should always be performed for quantification. The feasibility of MR-based attenuation correction was shown. When accurate quantification is necessary, a UTE-MRbased attenuation correction should be used.},
  author       = {Keereman, Vincent and Fierens, Yves and Vanhove, Christian and Lahoutte, Tony and Vandenberghe, Stefaan},
  issn         = {1535-3508},
  journal      = {MOLECULAR IMAGING},
  keyword      = {SUBSETS EXPECTATION MAXIMIZATION,PINHOLE SPECT,CT,PET/MRI,PHANTOM,QUANTIFICATION,RECONSTRUCTION,COEFFICIENTS,ACCURACY,IMAGES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {155--165},
  title        = {Magnetic resonace--based attenuation correction for micro--single-photon emission computed tomography},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2310/7290.2011.00036},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Keereman, Vincent, Yves Fierens, Christian Vanhove, Tony Lahoutte, and Stefaan Vandenberghe. 2012. “Magnetic Resonace–based Attenuation Correction for Micro–single-photon Emission Computed Tomography.” Molecular Imaging 11 (2): 155–165.
APA
Keereman, V., Fierens, Y., Vanhove, C., Lahoutte, T., & Vandenberghe, S. (2012). Magnetic resonace–based attenuation correction for micro–single-photon emission computed tomography. MOLECULAR IMAGING, 11(2), 155–165.
Vancouver
1.
Keereman V, Fierens Y, Vanhove C, Lahoutte T, Vandenberghe S. Magnetic resonace–based attenuation correction for micro–single-photon emission computed tomography. MOLECULAR IMAGING. 2012;11(2):155–65.
MLA
Keereman, Vincent, Yves Fierens, Christian Vanhove, et al. “Magnetic Resonace–based Attenuation Correction for Micro–single-photon Emission Computed Tomography.” MOLECULAR IMAGING 11.2 (2012): 155–165. Print.