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Comparing spray gun and spray boom applications in two ivy crops with different crop densities

Dieter Foqué, Jan Pieters UGent and David Nuyttens (2012) HORTSCIENCE. 47(1). p.51-57
abstract
Flemish greenhouse growers predominantly use handheld spray guns and lances for their crop protection purposes despite the heavy workload and high risk for operator exposure associated with these techniques. These spray application techniques have also shown to be less effective than spray boom equipment under many conditions. Handheld spraying techniques are less expensive, however, and they are more flexible in practical use. Many growers also erroneously believe that high spray volumes and pressures are needed to assure good plant protection. The aim of this work was to evaluate the spray deposition, penetration, and uniformity between a manually pulled horizontal spray boom as compared with a spray gun under controlled laboratory conditions. In this study, we evaluated six spray application techniques, i.e., three spray boom and three spray gun techniques. In general, the deposition results were comparable between the spray boom and the spray gun applications. The spray boom applications, however, resulted in a more uniform spray distribution. At the plant level, the spray distribution was not uniform for any of the techniques used; the highest deposits were observed on the upper (or adaxial) side of the top leaves. Using spray guns at a higher spray pressure did not improve spray penetration in the canopy or deposition on the bottom (or abaxial) side of the leaves. Of the different nozzle types tested on the spray boom, the extended range flat fan XR 8003 gave the best results. Crop density clearly affected crop penetration and deposition on the bottom side of the leaves.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
EXPOSURE, DEPOSITION, GREENHOUSE, POT PLANTS, Hedera helix, spray deposition, spray nozzle, spray gun, spray boom, plant protection, HANDGUN, ANGLE
journal title
HORTSCIENCE
Hortscience
volume
47
issue
1
pages
51 - 57
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000299659400008
JCR category
HORTICULTURE
JCR impact factor
0.938 (2012)
JCR rank
12/32 (2012)
JCR quartile
2 (2012)
ISSN
0018-5345
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1982877
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1982877
date created
2012-01-11 10:46:01
date last changed
2012-09-26 14:24:34
@article{1982877,
  abstract     = {Flemish greenhouse growers predominantly use handheld spray guns and lances for their crop protection purposes despite the heavy workload and high risk for operator exposure associated with these techniques. These spray application techniques have also shown to be less effective than spray boom equipment under many conditions. Handheld spraying techniques are less expensive, however, and they are more flexible in practical use. Many growers also erroneously believe that high spray volumes and pressures are needed to assure good plant protection. The aim of this work was to evaluate the spray deposition, penetration, and uniformity between a manually pulled horizontal spray boom as compared with a spray gun under controlled laboratory conditions. In this study, we evaluated six spray application techniques, i.e., three spray boom and three spray gun techniques. In general, the deposition results were comparable between the spray boom and the spray gun applications. The spray boom applications, however, resulted in a more uniform spray distribution. At the plant level, the spray distribution was not uniform for any of the techniques used; the highest deposits were observed on the upper (or adaxial) side of the top leaves. Using spray guns at a higher spray pressure did not improve spray penetration in the canopy or deposition on the bottom (or abaxial) side of the leaves. Of the different nozzle types tested on the spray boom, the extended range flat fan XR 8003 gave the best results. Crop density clearly affected crop penetration and deposition on the bottom side of the leaves.},
  author       = {Foqu{\'e}, Dieter and Pieters, Jan and Nuyttens, David},
  issn         = {0018-5345},
  journal      = {HORTSCIENCE},
  keyword      = {EXPOSURE,DEPOSITION,GREENHOUSE,POT PLANTS,Hedera helix,spray deposition,spray nozzle,spray gun,spray boom,plant protection,HANDGUN,ANGLE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {51--57},
  title        = {Comparing spray gun and spray boom applications in two ivy crops with different crop densities},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Foqué, Dieter, Jan Pieters, and David Nuyttens. 2012. “Comparing Spray Gun and Spray Boom Applications in Two Ivy Crops with Different Crop Densities.” Hortscience 47 (1): 51–57.
APA
Foqué, D., Pieters, J., & Nuyttens, D. (2012). Comparing spray gun and spray boom applications in two ivy crops with different crop densities. HORTSCIENCE, 47(1), 51–57.
Vancouver
1.
Foqué D, Pieters J, Nuyttens D. Comparing spray gun and spray boom applications in two ivy crops with different crop densities. HORTSCIENCE. 2012;47(1):51–7.
MLA
Foqué, Dieter, Jan Pieters, and David Nuyttens. “Comparing Spray Gun and Spray Boom Applications in Two Ivy Crops with Different Crop Densities.” HORTSCIENCE 47.1 (2012): 51–57. Print.