Advanced search
1 file | 137.14 KB

A biodiverse rich environment does not contribute to a better diet : a case study from DR Congo

(2012) PLOS ONE. 7(1).
Author
Organization
Abstract
The potential of biodiversity to increase and sustain nutrition security is increasingly recognized by the international research community. To date however, dietary assessment studies that have assessed how biodiversity actually contributes to human diets are virtually absent. This study measured the contribution of wild edible plants (WEP) to the dietary quality in the high biodiverse context of DR Congo. The habitual dietary intake was estimated from 2 multiple-pass 24h dietary recalls for 363 urban and 129 rural women. All WEP were collected during previous ethnobotanical investigations and identified and deposited in the National Botanical Garden of Belgium (BR). Results showed that in a high biodiverse region with precarious food security, WEP are insufficiently consumed to increase nutrition security or dietary adequacy. The highest contribution came from Dacryodes edulis in the village sample contributing 4.8% of total energy intake. Considering the nutrient composition of the many WEP available in the region and known by the indigenous populations, the potential to increase nutrition security is vast. Additional research regarding the dietary contribution of agricultural biodiversity and the nutrient composition of WEP would allow to integrate them into appropriate dietary guidelines for the region and pave the way to domesticate the most interesting WEP.
Keywords
NUTRITIONAL-VALUE, RESOURCE-POOR SETTINGS, FOOD COMPOSITION, WILD VEGETABLES, WOMEN, SECURITY, MICRONUTRIENTS, CONSUMPTION, AFRICANA, TRECULIA

Downloads

  • Termote 2012 PO 7 1 e30533.pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 137.14 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Termote, Céline, Marcel Bwama Meyi, Benoît Dhed’a Djailo, Lieven Huybregts, Carl Lachat, Patrick Kolsteren, and Patrick Van Damme. 2012. “A Biodiverse Rich Environment Does Not Contribute to a Better Diet : a Case Study from DR Congo.” Plos One 7 (1).
APA
Termote, C., Bwama Meyi, M., Dhed’a Djailo, B., Huybregts, L., Lachat, C., Kolsteren, P., & Van Damme, P. (2012). A biodiverse rich environment does not contribute to a better diet : a case study from DR Congo. PLOS ONE, 7(1).
Vancouver
1.
Termote C, Bwama Meyi M, Dhed’a Djailo B, Huybregts L, Lachat C, Kolsteren P, et al. A biodiverse rich environment does not contribute to a better diet : a case study from DR Congo. PLOS ONE. 2012;7(1).
MLA
Termote, Céline, Marcel Bwama Meyi, Benoît Dhed’a Djailo, et al. “A Biodiverse Rich Environment Does Not Contribute to a Better Diet : a Case Study from DR Congo.” PLOS ONE 7.1 (2012): n. pag. Print.
@article{1982391,
  abstract     = {The potential of biodiversity to increase and sustain nutrition security is increasingly recognized by the international research community. To date however, dietary assessment studies that have assessed how biodiversity actually contributes to human diets are virtually absent. This study measured the contribution of wild edible plants (WEP) to the dietary quality in the high biodiverse context of DR Congo.  The habitual dietary intake was estimated from 2 multiple-pass 24h dietary recalls for 363 urban and 129 rural women.  All WEP were collected during previous ethnobotanical investigations and identified and deposited in the National Botanical Garden of Belgium (BR).  Results showed that in a high biodiverse region with precarious food security, WEP are insufficiently consumed to increase nutrition security or dietary adequacy. The highest contribution came from Dacryodes edulis in the village sample contributing 4.8\% of total energy intake. Considering the nutrient composition of the many WEP available in the region and known by the indigenous populations, the potential to increase nutrition security is vast. Additional research regarding the dietary contribution of agricultural biodiversity and the nutrient composition of WEP would allow to integrate them into appropriate dietary guidelines for the region and pave the way to domesticate the most interesting WEP.},
  articleno    = {e30533},
  author       = {Termote, C{\'e}line and Bwama Meyi, Marcel and Dhed'a Djailo, Beno{\^i}t and Huybregts, Lieven and Lachat, Carl and Kolsteren, Patrick and Van Damme, Patrick},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  journal      = {PLOS ONE},
  keyword      = {NUTRITIONAL-VALUE,RESOURCE-POOR SETTINGS,FOOD COMPOSITION,WILD VEGETABLES,WOMEN,SECURITY,MICRONUTRIENTS,CONSUMPTION,AFRICANA,TRECULIA},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {10},
  title        = {A biodiverse rich environment does not contribute to a better diet : a case study from DR Congo},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0030533},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2012},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: