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Ground-penetrating radar survey at the Roman town of Mariana (Corsica), complemented with fluxgate gradiometer data and old and recent excavation results

Lieven Verdonck UGent, Frank Vermeulen UGent, Cristina Corsi and Roald Docter UGent (2012) NEAR SURFACE GEOPHYSICS. 10(1). p.35-45
abstract
This paper presents the results of a GPR survey carried out at the Roman town of Mariana (Corsica, France). Excavations (1959-1965 and 2000-2007) yielded a Roman street with houses and shops, an early mediaeval cathedral and a mediaeval bishop's palace. When compared with the hypothetical town limits derived from aerial photography, old cadastral maps and the location of two cemeteries, the excavations are in an eccentric position. The principal aim of the geophysical survey was to shed more light on the Early Imperial town centre (1st-2nd century AD), which was to be found further north. The results from a fluxgate gradiometer survey demonstrated the presence of buildings with an orientation corresponding to the excavated street. In the GPR data, an orthogonal street system became noticeable and most of the buildings can be identified as private dwellings. In several parts of the town, there are indications for more than one occupation phase. For example, in the north-western insula of the main survey area, the GPR results show a large building complex with deep foundations, as well as shallow walls of poor construction quality in the courtyard of this building. A trial excavation confirmed this dichotomy: it revealed solid walls with brick facings originating in the 1st or 2nd century AD, as opposed to alignments of loose boulders, not older than the 3rd century. On the basis of the GPR results, two small excavation trenches from the 1930s, one of which contained the remains of a bathhouse, can now be located exactly.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (proceedingsPaper)
publication status
published
subject
journal title
NEAR SURFACE GEOPHYSICS
Near Surf. Geophys.
volume
10
issue
1
issue title
Archaeogeophysics : recent and advanced applications of GPR for archaeological prospection
pages
35 - 45
conference name
13th International conference on Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR). Archaeology session
conference location
Lecce, Italy
conference start
2010-06-21
conference end
2010-06-25
Web of Science type
Article; Proceedings Paper
Web of Science id
000300855900005
JCR category
GEOCHEMISTRY & GEOPHYSICS
JCR impact factor
1.123 (2012)
JCR rank
48/76 (2012)
JCR quartile
3 (2012)
ISSN
1569-4445
DOI
10.3997/1873-0604.2011034
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1981461
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1981461
date created
2012-01-10 11:13:50
date last changed
2013-01-10 13:48:26
@article{1981461,
  abstract     = {This paper presents the results of a GPR survey carried out at the Roman town of Mariana (Corsica, France). Excavations (1959-1965 and 2000-2007) yielded a Roman street with houses and shops, an early mediaeval cathedral and a mediaeval bishop's palace. When compared with the hypothetical town limits derived from aerial photography, old cadastral maps and the location of two cemeteries, the excavations are in an eccentric position. The principal aim of the geophysical survey was to shed more light on the Early Imperial town centre (1st-2nd century AD), which was to be found further north. The results from a fluxgate gradiometer survey demonstrated the presence of buildings with an orientation corresponding to the excavated street. In the GPR data, an orthogonal street system became noticeable and most of the buildings can be identified as private dwellings. In several parts of the town, there are indications for more than one occupation phase. For example, in the north-western insula of the main survey area, the GPR results show a large building complex with deep foundations, as well as shallow walls of poor construction quality in the courtyard of this building. A trial excavation confirmed this dichotomy: it revealed solid walls with brick facings originating in the 1st or 2nd century AD, as opposed to alignments of loose boulders, not older than the 3rd century. On the basis of the GPR results, two small excavation trenches from the 1930s, one of which contained the remains of a bathhouse, can now be located exactly.},
  author       = {Verdonck, Lieven and Vermeulen, Frank and Corsi, Cristina and Docter, Roald},
  issn         = {1569-4445},
  journal      = {NEAR SURFACE GEOPHYSICS},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Lecce, Italy},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {35--45},
  title        = {Ground-penetrating radar survey at the Roman town of Mariana (Corsica), complemented with fluxgate gradiometer data and old and recent excavation results},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3997/1873-0604.2011034},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Verdonck, Lieven, Frank Vermeulen, Cristina Corsi, and Roald Docter. 2012. “Ground-penetrating Radar Survey at the Roman Town of Mariana (Corsica), Complemented with Fluxgate Gradiometer Data and Old and Recent Excavation Results.” Near Surface Geophysics 10 (1): 35–45.
APA
Verdonck, Lieven, Vermeulen, F., Corsi, C., & Docter, R. (2012). Ground-penetrating radar survey at the Roman town of Mariana (Corsica), complemented with fluxgate gradiometer data and old and recent excavation results. NEAR SURFACE GEOPHYSICS, 10(1), 35–45. Presented at the 13th International conference on Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR). Archaeology session.
Vancouver
1.
Verdonck L, Vermeulen F, Corsi C, Docter R. Ground-penetrating radar survey at the Roman town of Mariana (Corsica), complemented with fluxgate gradiometer data and old and recent excavation results. NEAR SURFACE GEOPHYSICS. 2012;10(1):35–45.
MLA
Verdonck, Lieven, Frank Vermeulen, Cristina Corsi, et al. “Ground-penetrating Radar Survey at the Roman Town of Mariana (Corsica), Complemented with Fluxgate Gradiometer Data and Old and Recent Excavation Results.” NEAR SURFACE GEOPHYSICS 10.1 (2012): 35–45. Print.