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How Spanish were the Spanish Netherlands?

René Vermeir UGent (2012) DUTCH CROSSING-JOURNAL OF LOW COUNTRIES STUDIES. 36(1). p.3-18
abstract
It is a firmly held belief that, from 1555 until 1700, the successive Habsburg sovereigns of the so-called Spanish Netherlands usurped the authority of the territory and maintained their power only by means of an army of occupation. Although recent research has thoroughly revised this antiquated analysis, it continues to live on until the present day. This article illustrates how stereotypes of Spanish usurpation were established at the beginning of the nineteenth century, both in the scholarly and popular literature, and demonstrates that, in the Spanish Netherlands, there was no 'absolutism' or 'occupation' on the part of the Habsburg authorities. On the contrary, after the separation from the rebellious provinces and the creation of the Dutch Republic, the Southern Netherlands were able to benefit from relative autonomy, at least when it came to domestic issues.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Low Countries, Spanish Netherlands, Castile, Early modern period (sixteenth-seventeenth century)
journal title
DUTCH CROSSING-JOURNAL OF LOW COUNTRIES STUDIES
Dutch Crossing
volume
36
issue
1
pages
3 - 18
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000300873100002
JCR category
HISTORY
JCR impact factor
0.091 (2012)
JCR rank
59/68 (2012)
JCR quartile
4 (2012)
ISSN
0309-6564
DOI
10.1179/0309656411Z.0000000004
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1978501
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1978501
date created
2012-01-04 22:50:32
date last changed
2015-06-17 09:53:38
@article{1978501,
  abstract     = {It is a firmly held belief that, from 1555 until 1700, the successive Habsburg sovereigns of the so-called Spanish Netherlands usurped the authority of the territory and maintained their power only by means of an army of occupation. Although recent research has thoroughly revised this antiquated analysis, it continues to live on until the present day. This article illustrates how stereotypes of Spanish usurpation were established at the beginning of the nineteenth century, both in the scholarly and popular literature, and demonstrates that, in the Spanish Netherlands, there was no 'absolutism' or 'occupation' on the part of the Habsburg authorities. On the contrary, after the separation from the rebellious provinces and the creation of the Dutch Republic, the Southern Netherlands were able to benefit from relative autonomy, at least when it came to domestic issues.},
  author       = {Vermeir, Ren{\'e}},
  issn         = {0309-6564},
  journal      = {DUTCH CROSSING-JOURNAL OF LOW COUNTRIES STUDIES},
  keyword      = {Low Countries,Spanish Netherlands,Castile,Early modern period (sixteenth-seventeenth century)},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {3--18},
  title        = {How Spanish were the Spanish Netherlands?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/0309656411Z.0000000004},
  volume       = {36},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Vermeir, René. 2012. “How Spanish Were the Spanish Netherlands?” Dutch Crossing-journal of Low Countries Studies 36 (1): 3–18.
APA
Vermeir, R. (2012). How Spanish were the Spanish Netherlands? DUTCH CROSSING-JOURNAL OF LOW COUNTRIES STUDIES, 36(1), 3–18.
Vancouver
1.
Vermeir R. How Spanish were the Spanish Netherlands? DUTCH CROSSING-JOURNAL OF LOW COUNTRIES STUDIES. 2012;36(1):3–18.
MLA
Vermeir, René. “How Spanish Were the Spanish Netherlands?” DUTCH CROSSING-JOURNAL OF LOW COUNTRIES STUDIES 36.1 (2012): 3–18. Print.