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Hydrologic controls of large floods in a small basin: central Appalachian case study

Peter Troch, James A Smith, Eric F Wood and François De Troch (1994) JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGY. 156(1-4). p.285-309
abstract
This paper reports the results of empirical and model-based analysis of extreme flood events observed in a small basin. The study catchment, WE-38 Mahantango Creek (7.2 km2), is situated in the North Appalachian Valley and Ridge province of eastern Pennsylvania. Data from four rain gauges and one water level station are available at 5 min intervals. From the observations, 12 flood events were selected for detailed analysis. The data include tropical storm Agnes (21-24 June 1972), which was responsible for one of the most devastating floods in the region. Model-based analysis of hydrologic response is used to study the dominating runoff processes in the catchment. In this study, we use a distributed version of Topmodel to model runoff generation, and a lumped hillslope and channel routing model to model overland flow and channel flow. The runoff generation model relies on a topographic index to predict saturation excess runoff and on Philip's infiltration equation to predict infiltration excess runoff. The runoff routing model is based on the channel network width function and on the drainage basin hillslope function. The relative roles of initial conditions, soil properties and rainfall rates in determining hydrologic response in the basin are investigated. The flood frequency distribution seems to be insensitive to scaled maximum rainfall intensity. However, the flood frequency distribution is strongly affected by the scaled initial storage capacity. Simulated hydrograph characteristics, such as peak discharge, are very sensitive to the overland flow velocity parameter in the routing model.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
FREQUENCY-DISTRIBUTION, SIMILARITY, SCALE, MODEL
journal title
JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGY
J. Hydrol.
volume
156
issue
1-4
pages
285 - 309
Web of Science type
Article
ISSN
0022-1694
DOI
10.1016/0022-1694(94)90082-5
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
197492
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-197492
date created
2004-01-14 13:42:00
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:38:11
@article{197492,
  abstract     = {This paper reports the results of empirical and model-based analysis of extreme flood events observed in a small basin. The study catchment, WE-38 Mahantango Creek (7.2 km2), is situated in the North Appalachian Valley and Ridge province of eastern Pennsylvania. Data from four rain gauges and one water level station are available at 5 min intervals. From the observations, 12 flood events were selected for detailed analysis. The data include tropical storm Agnes (21-24 June 1972), which was responsible for one of the most devastating floods in the region. Model-based analysis of hydrologic response is used to study the dominating runoff processes in the catchment. In this study, we use a distributed version of Topmodel to model runoff generation, and a lumped hillslope and channel routing model to model overland flow and channel flow. The runoff generation model relies on a topographic index to predict saturation excess runoff and on Philip's infiltration equation to predict infiltration excess runoff. The runoff routing model is based on the channel network width function and on the drainage basin hillslope function. The relative roles of initial conditions, soil properties and rainfall rates in determining hydrologic response in the basin are investigated. The flood frequency distribution seems to be insensitive to scaled maximum rainfall intensity. However, the flood frequency distribution is strongly affected by the scaled initial storage capacity. Simulated hydrograph characteristics, such as peak discharge, are very sensitive to the overland flow velocity parameter in the routing model.},
  author       = {Troch, Peter and Smith, James A and Wood, Eric F and De Troch, Fran\c{c}ois},
  issn         = {0022-1694},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGY},
  keyword      = {FREQUENCY-DISTRIBUTION,SIMILARITY,SCALE,MODEL},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-4},
  pages        = {285--309},
  title        = {Hydrologic controls of large floods in a small basin: central Appalachian case study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0022-1694(94)90082-5},
  volume       = {156},
  year         = {1994},
}

Chicago
Troch, Peter, James A Smith, Eric F Wood, and François De Troch. 1994. “Hydrologic Controls of Large Floods in a Small Basin: Central Appalachian Case Study.” Journal of Hydrology 156 (1-4): 285–309.
APA
Troch, Peter, Smith, J. A., Wood, E. F., & De Troch, F. (1994). Hydrologic controls of large floods in a small basin: central Appalachian case study. JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGY, 156(1-4), 285–309.
Vancouver
1.
Troch P, Smith JA, Wood EF, De Troch F. Hydrologic controls of large floods in a small basin: central Appalachian case study. JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGY. 1994;156(1-4):285–309.
MLA
Troch, Peter, James A Smith, Eric F Wood, et al. “Hydrologic Controls of Large Floods in a Small Basin: Central Appalachian Case Study.” JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGY 156.1-4 (1994): 285–309. Print.