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Effect of guar gum on in vivo fermentation kinetics and end product profile in cats

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Abstract
Introduction: The objective of this study was to investigate the fermentation kinetics and end products of guar gum in cats. This substrate has never been used before as a songle source of soluble fiber in this species in vivo. Guar gum is, however, considered to be fermentable with a high propionic acid yield based on in vitro data. Materials and Methods: Ten adult cats were fed a commercially available dry cat food, low in protein (27%DM) and without added soluble fiber during a 10-week-period. The cats were divided at random in 2 groups and 4% guar gum or cellulose were supplemented to the diet on DM basis. Both fiber supplements were tested for 5 weeks in a 2x2 Latin square design. Sampling took place during weeks 4 and 5 of every period. Breath samples were collected over a period of 6 hours and the hydrogen concentration was measured immediately. Blood samples were collected for acylcarnitine profile and 3-methylhistidine concentration. Fresh faecal samples were collected for analyses of short-chain fatty acids, ammonia and putrefactive substances. The faecal pH was measured and consistency was scored within 30 minutes after voiding. Results and Discussion: The mean hydrogen concentration of guar gum supplemented cats over all measured time points was numerically higher than for cats supplemented with cellulose. This difference, however, was not statistically significant (P=0.325) and the variation between cats was very high. The faecal pH was significantly lower in the guar gum supplemented cats compared to the cellulose control cats (P=0.003). This result is an indirect proof of a higher production of short-chain fatty acids when guar gum is added to the diet compared to cellulose. For the faecal consistency score a group effect was seen (P=0.008). To date, other analyses were not performed yet. Conclusions: Guar gum is fermented in vivo in cats, as shown from these preliminary data. The numerically higher hydrogen concentration and a significant lower faecal pH in the guar gum supplemented cats compared to the cellulose supplemented cats support this statement.
Keywords
cats, fermentation, guar gum

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Chicago
Rochus, Kristel, Geert Janssens, Hannelore Van de Velde, Adronie Verbrugghe, Brigitte Wuyts, Lynn Vanhaecke, and Myriam Hesta. 2011. “Effect of Guar Gum on in Vivo Fermentation Kinetics and End Product Profile in Cats.” In Congress Proceedings : 15th Congress European Society of Veterinary and Comparative Nutrition, ed. Carlos Castrillo, MA Latorre, M Fondevilla, and JA Guada, 64–64. Zaragoza, Spain: Universidad Zaragoza. Enivronmental Sciences Institute.
APA
Rochus, K., Janssens, G., Van de Velde, H., Verbrugghe, A., Wuyts, B., Vanhaecke, L., & Hesta, M. (2011). Effect of guar gum on in vivo fermentation kinetics and end product profile in cats. In C. Castrillo, M. Latorre, M. Fondevilla, & J. Guada (Eds.), Congress proceedings : 15th congress European Society of Veterinary and Comparative Nutrition (pp. 64–64). Presented at the 15th Congress of the European Society of Veterinary and Comparative Nutrition (ESVCN 2011), Zaragoza, Spain: Universidad Zaragoza. Enivronmental Sciences Institute.
Vancouver
1.
Rochus K, Janssens G, Van de Velde H, Verbrugghe A, Wuyts B, Vanhaecke L, et al. Effect of guar gum on in vivo fermentation kinetics and end product profile in cats. In: Castrillo C, Latorre M, Fondevilla M, Guada J, editors. Congress proceedings : 15th congress European Society of Veterinary and Comparative Nutrition. Zaragoza, Spain: Universidad Zaragoza. Enivronmental Sciences Institute; 2011. p. 64–64.
MLA
Rochus, Kristel, Geert Janssens, Hannelore Van de Velde, et al. “Effect of Guar Gum on in Vivo Fermentation Kinetics and End Product Profile in Cats.” Congress Proceedings : 15th Congress European Society of Veterinary and Comparative Nutrition. Ed. Carlos Castrillo et al. Zaragoza, Spain: Universidad Zaragoza. Enivronmental Sciences Institute, 2011. 64–64. Print.
@inproceedings{1971433,
  abstract     = {Introduction: The objective of this study was to investigate the fermentation kinetics and end products of guar gum in cats. This substrate has never been used before as a songle source of soluble fiber in this species in vivo. Guar gum is, however, considered to be fermentable with a high propionic acid yield based on in vitro data.
Materials and Methods: Ten adult cats were fed a commercially available dry cat food, low in protein (27\%DM) and without added soluble fiber during a 10-week-period. The cats were divided at random in 2 groups and 4\% guar gum or cellulose were supplemented to the diet on DM basis. Both fiber supplements were tested for 5 weeks in a 2x2 Latin square design. Sampling took place during weeks 4 and 5 of every period. Breath samples were collected over a period of 6 hours and the hydrogen concentration was measured immediately. Blood samples were collected for acylcarnitine profile and 3-methylhistidine concentration. Fresh faecal samples were collected for analyses of short-chain fatty acids, ammonia and putrefactive substances. The faecal pH was measured and consistency was scored within 30 minutes after voiding.
Results and Discussion: The mean hydrogen concentration of guar gum supplemented cats over all measured time points was numerically higher than for cats supplemented with cellulose. This difference, however, was not statistically significant (P=0.325) and the variation between cats was very high. The faecal pH was significantly lower in the guar gum supplemented cats compared to the cellulose control cats (P=0.003). This result is an indirect proof of a higher production of short-chain fatty acids when guar gum is added to the diet compared to cellulose. For the faecal consistency score a group effect was seen (P=0.008). To date, other analyses were not performed yet.
Conclusions: Guar gum is fermented in vivo in cats, as shown from these preliminary data. The numerically higher hydrogen concentration and a significant lower faecal pH in the guar gum supplemented cats compared to the cellulose supplemented cats support this statement.},
  author       = {Rochus, Kristel and Janssens, Geert and Van de Velde, Hannelore and Verbrugghe, Adronie and Wuyts, Brigitte and Vanhaecke, Lynn and Hesta, Myriam},
  booktitle    = {Congress proceedings : 15th congress European Society of Veterinary and Comparative Nutrition},
  editor       = {Castrillo, Carlos and Latorre, MA and Fondevilla, M and Guada, JA},
  keyword      = {cats,fermentation,guar gum},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Zaragoza, Spain},
  pages        = {64--64},
  publisher    = {Universidad Zaragoza. Enivronmental Sciences Institute},
  title        = {Effect of guar gum on in vivo fermentation kinetics and end product profile in cats},
  year         = {2011},
}