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Spatial proximity and distance travelled: commuting versus non-commuting trips in Flanders

Kobe Boussauw (UGent)
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Abstract
This paper examines the relationship between daily travel distance and spatial proximity characteristics in Flanders (and partly also in Brussels), in the north of Belgium. Important regional variations in commuting trip lengths are noticed, which are related to the spatial-economic structure including aspects of population density and spatial proximity between homes and destinations such as jobs, schools or leisure. Commuter data obtained from the General Socio-Economic Survey 2001 is area covering and offers a lot of information. It is obvious that residents in the economic core areas produce less commuter mobility than people living in remote areas that have still access to the Brussels-Antwerp region. Proximity between home and work locations is paramount, when proximity is defined at a regional scale. Next, the spatial distribution of commuting distances, based on residential location, is compared to overall daily travel patterns including non-work travel. Since the second kind of data is only available in the form of a rather small sample, a multivariate regression equation based on spatial characteristics has been developed in order to extrapolate sample data throughout the Flanders region. When assessing overall daily travel patterns, including non-work travel, variables based on the spatial distribution of jobs do not show significant effects on the travel distance. However, spatial proximity is again paramount, although proximity should now be defined at a local scale. When considering all daily travel, the distance between the residence and an even small urban centre is much more decisive than the distance to the economic core areas (which is mainly consisting of the Brussels-Antwerp region). This finding qualifies the limited importance of the commute: today, it is mainly non-professional travel that is growing. Furthermore, the results suggest that residential density and land use mix in urban areas is the best guarantee for curbing excessive forms of overall (but especially: non-commuter) mobility.
Keywords
sustainable spatial development, energy performance, travel behaviour, Flanders

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Chicago
Boussauw, Kobe. 2011. “Spatial Proximity and Distance Travelled: Commuting Versus Non-commuting Trips in Flanders.” In Spatial Planning in Flanders/Belgium : Challenges for Policy, Opportunities for Society, Papers.
APA
Boussauw, K. (2011). Spatial proximity and distance travelled: commuting versus non-commuting trips in Flanders. Spatial planning in Flanders/Belgium : challenges for policy, opportunities for society, Papers. Presented at the Spatial planning in Flanders/Belgium : challenges for policy, opportunities for society.
Vancouver
1.
Boussauw K. Spatial proximity and distance travelled: commuting versus non-commuting trips in Flanders. Spatial planning in Flanders/Belgium : challenges for policy, opportunities for society, Papers. 2011.
MLA
Boussauw, Kobe. “Spatial Proximity and Distance Travelled: Commuting Versus Non-commuting Trips in Flanders.” Spatial Planning in Flanders/Belgium : Challenges for Policy, Opportunities for Society, Papers. 2011. Print.
@inproceedings{1969415,
  abstract     = {This paper examines the relationship between daily travel distance and spatial proximity characteristics in Flanders (and partly also in Brussels), in the north of Belgium. Important regional variations in commuting trip lengths are noticed, which are related to the spatial-economic structure including aspects of population density and spatial proximity between homes and destinations such as jobs, schools or leisure. Commuter data obtained from the General Socio-Economic Survey 2001 is area covering and offers a lot of information. It is obvious that residents in the economic core areas produce less commuter mobility than people living in remote areas that have still access to the Brussels-Antwerp region. Proximity between home and work locations is paramount, when proximity is defined at a regional scale.
Next, the spatial distribution of commuting distances, based on residential location, is compared to overall daily travel patterns including non-work travel. Since the second kind of data is only available in the form of a rather small sample, a multivariate regression equation based on spatial characteristics has been developed in order to extrapolate sample data throughout the Flanders region.
When assessing overall daily travel patterns, including non-work travel, variables based on the spatial distribution of jobs do not show significant effects on the travel distance. However, spatial proximity is again paramount, although proximity should now be defined at a local scale. When considering all daily travel, the distance between the residence and an even small urban centre is much more decisive than the distance to the economic core areas (which is mainly consisting of the Brussels-Antwerp region).
This finding qualifies the limited importance of the commute: today, it is mainly non-professional travel that is growing. Furthermore, the results suggest that residential density and land use mix in urban areas is the best guarantee for curbing excessive forms of overall (but especially: non-commuter) mobility.},
  author       = {Boussauw, Kobe},
  booktitle    = {Spatial planning in Flanders/Belgium : challenges for policy, opportunities for society, Papers},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Leuven, Belgium},
  pages        = {13},
  title        = {Spatial proximity and distance travelled: commuting versus non-commuting trips in Flanders},
  year         = {2011},
}