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The dominance of associative theorizing in implicit attitude research: propositional and behavioral alternatives

Sean Hughes, Dermot Barnes-Holmes and Jan De Houwer UGent (2011) PSYCHOLOGICAL RECORD. 61(3). p.465-496
abstract
In the present article we re-examine one of the most deeply entrenched assumptions in modern attitude research, namely, that implicit social cognition is a product of associations between mental representations. More precisely, we argue that the analysis of implicit social cognition in psychology is curtailed by the widespread adoption of the associative assumption. We open with a brief overview of the attitude literature, with a particular emphasis on the fundamental structure, measurement, and conceptual differences that have emerged between implicit and explicit attitudes in recent times. Thereafter we address the influence of the associative assumption in shaping our methodologies, research questions, and theories regarding implicit and explicit attitudes. In the third and final section, we offer two alternative and perhaps complementary nonassociative models for understanding implicit cognition. While the first model situates its explanation at the mental (propositional) level of analysis and the second at the functional, each potentially allows for novel theoretical and empirical predictions and insight into attitudes above and beyond the boundaries of traditional associationism.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
ASSESSMENT PROCEDURE IRAP, RELATIONAL ASSESSMENT PROCEDURE, SOCIAL COGNITION, SELF-ESTEEM, EXPLICIT ATTITUDES, FUNCTIONAL CONTEXTUALISM, STIMULUS EQUIVALENCE, PREDICTIVE-VALIDITY, MULTIPLE PROCESSES, RACIAL PREJUDICE, attitudes, implicit cognition, associative, propositional, functional
journal title
PSYCHOLOGICAL RECORD
Psychol. Rec.
volume
61
issue
3
pages
465 - 496
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000296105900010
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, MULTIDISCIPLINARY
JCR impact factor
0.96 (2011)
JCR rank
62/123 (2011)
JCR quartile
3 (2011)
ISSN
0033-2933
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1968327
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1968327
date created
2011-12-15 15:46:45
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:45:31
@article{1968327,
  abstract     = {In the present article we re-examine one of the most deeply entrenched assumptions in modern attitude research, namely, that implicit social cognition is a product of associations between mental representations. More precisely, we argue that the analysis of implicit social cognition in psychology is curtailed by the widespread adoption of the associative assumption. We open with a brief overview of the attitude literature, with a particular emphasis on the fundamental structure, measurement, and conceptual differences that have emerged between implicit and explicit attitudes in recent times. Thereafter we address the influence of the associative assumption in shaping our methodologies, research questions, and theories regarding implicit and explicit attitudes. In the third and final section, we offer two alternative and perhaps complementary nonassociative models for understanding implicit cognition. While the first model situates its explanation at the mental (propositional) level of analysis and the second at the functional, each potentially allows for novel theoretical and empirical predictions and insight into attitudes above and beyond the boundaries of traditional associationism.},
  author       = {Hughes, Sean and Barnes-Holmes, Dermot and De Houwer, Jan},
  issn         = {0033-2933},
  journal      = {PSYCHOLOGICAL RECORD},
  keyword      = {ASSESSMENT PROCEDURE IRAP,RELATIONAL ASSESSMENT PROCEDURE,SOCIAL COGNITION,SELF-ESTEEM,EXPLICIT ATTITUDES,FUNCTIONAL CONTEXTUALISM,STIMULUS EQUIVALENCE,PREDICTIVE-VALIDITY,MULTIPLE PROCESSES,RACIAL PREJUDICE,attitudes,implicit cognition,associative,propositional,functional},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {465--496},
  title        = {The dominance of associative theorizing in implicit attitude research: propositional and behavioral alternatives},
  volume       = {61},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Hughes, Sean, Dermot Barnes-Holmes, and Jan De Houwer. 2011. “The Dominance of Associative Theorizing in Implicit Attitude Research: Propositional and Behavioral Alternatives.” Psychological Record 61 (3): 465–496.
APA
Hughes, S., Barnes-Holmes, D., & De Houwer, J. (2011). The dominance of associative theorizing in implicit attitude research: propositional and behavioral alternatives. PSYCHOLOGICAL RECORD, 61(3), 465–496.
Vancouver
1.
Hughes S, Barnes-Holmes D, De Houwer J. The dominance of associative theorizing in implicit attitude research: propositional and behavioral alternatives. PSYCHOLOGICAL RECORD. 2011;61(3):465–96.
MLA
Hughes, Sean, Dermot Barnes-Holmes, and Jan De Houwer. “The Dominance of Associative Theorizing in Implicit Attitude Research: Propositional and Behavioral Alternatives.” PSYCHOLOGICAL RECORD 61.3 (2011): 465–496. Print.