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Ethnobotanical survey of pesticidal plants used in South Uganda: case study of Masaka district

Tedson Julius Mwine UGent, Patrick Van Damme UGent, Kamoga Gerard and Kudamba Charles (2011) JOURNAL OF MEDICINAL PLANTS RESEARCH. 5(7). p.1155-1163
abstract
Use of synthetic pesticides in developing countries is not only limited by their being expensive but also the small (uneconomic) fields whose limited production costs cannot offset costs of agricultural implements like agro-chemicals. Subsistence farmers, therefore, have no choice but to use local methods of controlling pests, one of which is the use of traditional and of late introduced pesticidal plants' extracts. In this study, whose main objective was to record all pesticidal plants used in Southern Uganda, Masaka district, it was established that thirty four species belonging to eighteen families are currently used in traditional plant production. Most useful species were Azadirachta indica and Tagetes minuta while the most frequently cited families were Meliaceae and Euphorbiaceae. It was noted that of the plant species recorded, some plants like A. indica, Melia azedarach, and T. minuta are already scientifically established pesticidal plants whereas others like Euphorbia tirucalli, Bidens pilosa, Vernonia amygdalina may be known for other uses but not for this purpose and hence the need for their efficacy evaluation. Some important pesticidal plants like Abrus precatorius, Euphorbia candelabrum and Phoenix reclinata were reportedly becoming increasingly rare and would need conservation. The need to carry out such surveys in order to obtain inventories was observed and recording this knowledge before it disappears with the aging farmers was seen as urgent.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
inventory, AFRICAN MEDICINAL-PLANTS, Indigenous knowledge, developing countries, conservation, KIBALE-NATIONAL-PARK, WESTERN UGANDA, ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL SURVEY, BOTANICAL INSECTICIDES, SECONDARY METABOLITES, HEALERS CONSENSUS, CONSERVATION, HERBIVORES, DISEASES
journal title
JOURNAL OF MEDICINAL PLANTS RESEARCH
J. Med. Plants Res.
volume
5
issue
7
pages
1155 - 1163
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000291888600016
ISSN
1996-0875
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1966602
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1966602
alternative location
http://www.academicjournals.org/jmpr/abstracts/abstracts/abstracts2011/4April/Mwine%20et%20al.htm
date created
2011-12-14 07:41:56
date last changed
2011-12-16 16:36:45
@article{1966602,
  abstract     = {Use of synthetic pesticides in developing countries is not only limited by their being expensive but also the small (uneconomic) fields whose limited production costs cannot offset costs of agricultural implements like agro-chemicals. Subsistence farmers, therefore, have no choice but to use local methods of controlling pests, one of which is the use of traditional and of late introduced pesticidal plants' extracts. In this study, whose main objective was to record all pesticidal plants used in Southern Uganda, Masaka district, it was established that thirty four species belonging to eighteen families are currently used in traditional plant production. Most useful species were Azadirachta indica and Tagetes minuta while the most frequently cited families were Meliaceae and Euphorbiaceae. It was noted that of the plant species recorded, some plants like A. indica, Melia azedarach, and T. minuta are already scientifically established pesticidal plants whereas others like Euphorbia tirucalli, Bidens pilosa, Vernonia amygdalina may be known for other uses but not for this purpose and hence the need for their efficacy evaluation. Some important pesticidal plants like Abrus precatorius, Euphorbia candelabrum and Phoenix reclinata were reportedly becoming increasingly rare and would need conservation. The need to carry out such surveys in order to obtain inventories was observed and recording this knowledge before it disappears with the aging farmers was seen as urgent.},
  author       = {Mwine, Tedson Julius and Van Damme, Patrick and Gerard, Kamoga and Charles, Kudamba},
  issn         = {1996-0875},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF MEDICINAL PLANTS RESEARCH},
  keyword      = {inventory,AFRICAN MEDICINAL-PLANTS,Indigenous knowledge,developing countries,conservation,KIBALE-NATIONAL-PARK,WESTERN UGANDA,ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL SURVEY,BOTANICAL INSECTICIDES,SECONDARY METABOLITES,HEALERS CONSENSUS,CONSERVATION,HERBIVORES,DISEASES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1155--1163},
  title        = {Ethnobotanical survey of pesticidal plants used in South Uganda: case study of Masaka district},
  url          = {http://www.academicjournals.org/jmpr/abstracts/abstracts/abstracts2011/4April/Mwine\%20et\%20al.htm},
  volume       = {5},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Mwine, Tedson Julius, Patrick Van Damme, Kamoga Gerard, and Kudamba Charles. 2011. “Ethnobotanical Survey of Pesticidal Plants Used in South Uganda: Case Study of Masaka District.” Journal of Medicinal Plants Research 5 (7): 1155–1163.
APA
Mwine, T. J., Van Damme, P., Gerard, K., & Charles, K. (2011). Ethnobotanical survey of pesticidal plants used in South Uganda: case study of Masaka district. JOURNAL OF MEDICINAL PLANTS RESEARCH, 5(7), 1155–1163.
Vancouver
1.
Mwine TJ, Van Damme P, Gerard K, Charles K. Ethnobotanical survey of pesticidal plants used in South Uganda: case study of Masaka district. JOURNAL OF MEDICINAL PLANTS RESEARCH. 2011;5(7):1155–63.
MLA
Mwine, Tedson Julius, Patrick Van Damme, Kamoga Gerard, et al. “Ethnobotanical Survey of Pesticidal Plants Used in South Uganda: Case Study of Masaka District.” JOURNAL OF MEDICINAL PLANTS RESEARCH 5.7 (2011): 1155–1163. Print.