Advanced search
4 files | 1.58 MB Add to list

Prebiotics to manage the microbial control of energy homeostasis

(2011) BENEFICIAL MICROBES. 2(4). p.305-318
Author
Organization
Abstract
The prevalence of obesity is continuously growing and has reached epidemic proportions. It is clear that current methods to combat obesity are not effective enough to reduce the problem. Therefore, further investigation is needed to develop new strategies. Recent research pointed out a potential role of the microbial community associated to the human host in controlling and influencing the energy homeostasis. According to the concept of Gastrointestinal Resource Management, this microbiota and its metabolic potential can be steered with the aim of improving host health. This review therefore focuses on the modulation of the intestinal microbiota through prebiotics with the aim to control of several aspects of metabolic homeostasis. In a first part, the importance of host-microbe cross-talk at the intestinal epithelium is discussed. Yet, energy metabolism, which includes both lipid and glucose metabolism, is also regulated by several key organs including the adipose tissue, brain, liver, muscles, pancreas and gut. Therefore, in a second part, we will discuss the microbial factors that are involved in the communication between these different tissues, and their potential management. Finally, we will give some future prospects of the use of prebiotics in an individualized treatment of metabolic disorders.
Keywords
obesity, diabetes, homeostasis, Prebiotics, mucosa, GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDE-1, DIET-INDUCED OBESITY, IMPROVES INSULIN SENSITIVITY, INNATE IMMUNE-SYSTEM, CHAIN FATTY-ACIDS, HIGH-FIBER DIET, GUT MICROBIOTA, LIPID-METABOLISM, INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA, RESISTANT STARCH

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 873.61 KB
  • Grootaert et al revised bis.pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 358.35 KB
  • Figure 1 revised.pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 50.68 KB
  • Figure2 revised.pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 293.89 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Grootaert, Charlotte, Massimo Marzorati, Pieter Van den Abbeele, et al. “Prebiotics to Manage the Microbial Control of Energy Homeostasis.” BENEFICIAL MICROBES 2.4 (2011): 305–318. Print.
APA
Grootaert, C., Marzorati, M., Van den Abbeele, P., Van de Wiele, T., & Possemiers, S. (2011). Prebiotics to manage the microbial control of energy homeostasis. BENEFICIAL MICROBES, 2(4), 305–318.
Chicago author-date
Grootaert, Charlotte, Massimo Marzorati, Pieter Van den Abbeele, Tom Van de Wiele, and Sam Possemiers. 2011. “Prebiotics to Manage the Microbial Control of Energy Homeostasis.” Beneficial Microbes 2 (4): 305–318.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Grootaert, Charlotte, Massimo Marzorati, Pieter Van den Abbeele, Tom Van de Wiele, and Sam Possemiers. 2011. “Prebiotics to Manage the Microbial Control of Energy Homeostasis.” Beneficial Microbes 2 (4): 305–318.
Vancouver
1.
Grootaert C, Marzorati M, Van den Abbeele P, Van de Wiele T, Possemiers S. Prebiotics to manage the microbial control of energy homeostasis. BENEFICIAL MICROBES. 2011;2(4):305–18.
IEEE
[1]
C. Grootaert, M. Marzorati, P. Van den Abbeele, T. Van de Wiele, and S. Possemiers, “Prebiotics to manage the microbial control of energy homeostasis,” BENEFICIAL MICROBES, vol. 2, no. 4, pp. 305–318, 2011.
@article{1966070,
  abstract     = {The prevalence of obesity is continuously growing and has reached epidemic proportions. It is clear that current methods to combat obesity are not effective enough to reduce the problem. Therefore, further investigation is needed to develop new strategies. Recent research pointed out a potential role of the microbial community associated to the human host in controlling and influencing the energy homeostasis. According to the concept of Gastrointestinal Resource Management, this microbiota and its metabolic potential can be steered with the aim of improving host health. This review therefore focuses on the modulation of the intestinal microbiota through prebiotics with the aim to control of several aspects of metabolic homeostasis. In a first part, the importance of host-microbe cross-talk at the intestinal epithelium is discussed. Yet, energy metabolism, which includes both lipid and glucose metabolism, is also regulated by several key organs including the adipose tissue, brain, liver, muscles, pancreas and gut. Therefore, in a second part, we will discuss the microbial factors that are involved in the communication between these different tissues, and their potential management. Finally, we will give some future prospects of the use of prebiotics in an individualized treatment of metabolic disorders.},
  author       = {Grootaert, Charlotte and Marzorati, Massimo and Van den Abbeele, Pieter and Van de Wiele, Tom and Possemiers, Sam},
  issn         = {1876-2883},
  journal      = {BENEFICIAL MICROBES},
  keywords     = {obesity,diabetes,homeostasis,Prebiotics,mucosa,GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDE-1,DIET-INDUCED OBESITY,IMPROVES INSULIN SENSITIVITY,INNATE IMMUNE-SYSTEM,CHAIN FATTY-ACIDS,HIGH-FIBER DIET,GUT MICROBIOTA,LIPID-METABOLISM,INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA,RESISTANT STARCH},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {305--318},
  title        = {Prebiotics to manage the microbial control of energy homeostasis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3920/BM2011.0020},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2011},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: