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Cue-switch effects do not rely on the same neural systems as task-switch effects

Wouter De Baene UGent and Marcel Brass UGent (2011) COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE & BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE. 11(4). p.600-607
abstract
The cued task-switching paradigm is often used to study cognitive control. In this paradigm, people are generally slower and make more errors when switching tasks as compared with repeating the same task. When two cues are mapped to each task, these switch costs could result from a mixture of cue-switch effects (which are thought to reflect cue encoding) and task-switch effects (which are thought to reflect task set preparation). In the behavioral literature, there has been a lively debate on the degree to which cue-switch effects and task-switch effects indeed reflect different phenomena. In the present study, we used fMRI to examine whether and to what extent the neural network underlying task-switch effects is also involved in cue-switch effects. We found task-switch but no cue-switch effects in the frequently observed preparation-related activation in fronto-parietal areas. These results suggest that the fronto-parietal areas displaying preparatory activity in task-switching paradigms are engaged in task preparation but not in cue encoding and that task preparation and cue encoding rely on completely different processes.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
COSTS, CORTEX, RECONFIGURATION, CLEVER HOMUNCULUS, Task-switching, Cue-switch, Cue-encoding, Cognitive control
journal title
COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE & BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
Cogn. Affect. Behav. Neurosci.
volume
11
issue
4
pages
600 - 607
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000297815500012
JCR category
BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
3.565 (2011)
JCR rank
8/47 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
1530-7026
DOI
10.3758/s13415-011-0055-9
project
The integrative neuroscience of behavioral control (Neuroscience)
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1963525
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1963525
date created
2011-12-08 13:58:56
date last changed
2013-02-27 09:07:03
@article{1963525,
  abstract     = {The cued task-switching paradigm is often used to study cognitive control. In this paradigm, people are generally slower and make more errors when switching tasks as compared with repeating the same task. When two cues are mapped to each task, these switch costs could result from a mixture of cue-switch effects (which are thought to reflect cue encoding) and task-switch effects (which are thought to reflect task set preparation). In the behavioral literature, there has been a lively debate on the degree to which cue-switch effects and task-switch effects indeed reflect different phenomena. In the present study, we used fMRI to examine whether and to what extent the neural network underlying task-switch effects is also involved in cue-switch effects. We found task-switch but no cue-switch effects in the frequently observed preparation-related activation in fronto-parietal areas. These results suggest that the fronto-parietal areas displaying preparatory activity in task-switching paradigms are engaged in task preparation but not in cue encoding and that task preparation and cue encoding rely on completely different processes.},
  author       = {De Baene, Wouter and Brass, Marcel},
  issn         = {1530-7026},
  journal      = {COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE \& BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE},
  keyword      = {COSTS,CORTEX,RECONFIGURATION,CLEVER HOMUNCULUS,Task-switching,Cue-switch,Cue-encoding,Cognitive control},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {600--607},
  title        = {Cue-switch effects do not rely on the same neural systems as task-switch effects},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13415-011-0055-9},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
De Baene, Wouter, and Marcel Brass. 2011. “Cue-switch Effects Do Not Rely on the Same Neural Systems as Task-switch Effects.” Cognitive Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience 11 (4): 600–607.
APA
De Baene, W., & Brass, M. (2011). Cue-switch effects do not rely on the same neural systems as task-switch effects. COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE & BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE, 11(4), 600–607.
Vancouver
1.
De Baene W, Brass M. Cue-switch effects do not rely on the same neural systems as task-switch effects. COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE & BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE. 2011;11(4):600–7.
MLA
De Baene, Wouter, and Marcel Brass. “Cue-switch Effects Do Not Rely on the Same Neural Systems as Task-switch Effects.” COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE & BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE 11.4 (2011): 600–607. Print.