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Sagittal standing posture and its association with spinal pain: a school-based epidemiological study of 1196 Flemish adolescents before age at peak height velocity

Mieke Dolphens UGent, Barbara Cagnie UGent, Pascal Coorevits UGent, Guy Vanderstraeten UGent, Greet Cardon UGent, Roseline D'hooge UGent and Lieven Danneels UGent (2012) SPINE. 37(19). p.1657-1666
abstract
Study design. Cross-sectional baseline dataset on the sagittal standing posture of 1196 adolescents. Objective. To describe and quantify common variations in the sagittal standing alignment in boys and girls who are in the same phase of growth, and to explore the association between habitual standing posture and measures for spinal pain. Summary of Background Data. Data on postural characteristics and spinal pain measures in adolescence is sparse, especially when somatic and biological maturity status is to be considered. Furthermore, our understanding of the relation between standing posture in the sagittal plane and spinal pain is deficient. Methods. Six hundred thirty-nine boys (mean ± SD age, 12.6±0.54 years) and 557 girls (10.6±0.47 years) with predicted years from peak height velocity (PHV) being 1.2±0.71 years and 1.2±0.59 years pre-PHV, respectively, were studied. Postural examination included the assessment of global alignment and local spinopelvic characteristics, using post-hoc analyses of digital images and direct body measurements (palpation, digital inclinometry, and wheeled accelerometry). Spinal pain experience was assessed by questionnaire. Results. A wide interindividual variation in sagittal posture characteristics was observed. Logistic regression analyses yielded global alignment parameters to be associated with low back pain (lifetime prevalence), neck pain (lifetime prevalence, 1-month prevalence, and doctor visit), and thoracic spine pain (doctor visit) outcome measures. None of the included local spinopelvic parameters could be identified as an associated factor with measures of spinal pain. Conclusions. The orientation of gross body segments with respect to the gravity line appear superior to local spinopelvic features in terms of clinical importance, at least in the current pre-PHV cohort. Opportunities may exist for postural subgrouping strategies to begin with global alignment parameters in order to gain further insight in the relationship between sagittal alignment and the relative risk of developing spinal pain/seeking medical consultation for this pain.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
RADIOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS, ADULT VOLUNTEERS, RISK-FACTORS, RELIABILITY, IDIOPATHIC SCOLIOSIS, PELVIC ALIGNMENT, LUMBAR SPINE, SKIN-SURFACE DEVICE, Posture, development, LOW-BACK-PAIN, spinal pain, sagittal balance, YOUNG-ADULTS, spinopelvic alignment
journal title
SPINE
Spine
volume
37
issue
19
pages
1657 - 1666
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000308352300015
JCR category
ORTHOPEDICS
JCR impact factor
2.159 (2012)
JCR rank
17/63 (2012)
JCR quartile
2 (2012)
ISSN
0362-2436
DOI
10.1097/BRS.0b013e3182408053
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1959946
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1959946
date created
2011-12-05 11:32:11
date last changed
2015-06-17 09:52:41
@article{1959946,
  abstract     = {Study design. Cross-sectional baseline dataset on the sagittal standing posture of 1196 adolescents.
Objective. To describe and quantify common variations in the sagittal standing alignment in boys and girls who are in the same phase of growth, and to explore the association between habitual standing posture and measures for spinal pain.
Summary of Background Data. Data on postural characteristics and spinal pain measures in adolescence is sparse, especially when somatic and biological maturity status is to be considered. Furthermore, our understanding of the relation between standing posture in the sagittal plane and spinal pain is deficient.
Methods. Six hundred thirty-nine boys (mean {\textpm} SD age, 12.6{\textpm}0.54 years) and 557 girls (10.6{\textpm}0.47 years) with predicted years from peak height velocity (PHV) being 1.2{\textpm}0.71 years and 1.2{\textpm}0.59 years pre-PHV, respectively, were studied. Postural examination included the assessment of global alignment and local spinopelvic characteristics, using post-hoc analyses of digital images and direct body measurements (palpation, digital inclinometry, and wheeled accelerometry). Spinal pain experience was assessed by questionnaire.
Results. A wide interindividual variation in sagittal posture characteristics was observed. Logistic regression analyses yielded global alignment parameters to be associated with low back pain (lifetime prevalence), neck pain (lifetime prevalence, 1-month prevalence, and doctor visit), and thoracic spine pain (doctor visit) outcome measures. None of the included local spinopelvic parameters could be identified as an associated factor with measures of spinal pain.
Conclusions. The orientation of gross body segments with respect to the gravity line appear superior to local spinopelvic features in terms of clinical importance, at least in the current pre-PHV cohort. Opportunities may exist for postural subgrouping strategies to begin with global alignment parameters in order to gain further insight in the relationship between sagittal alignment and the relative risk of developing spinal pain/seeking medical consultation for this pain.},
  author       = {Dolphens, Mieke and Cagnie, Barbara and Coorevits, Pascal and Vanderstraeten, Guy and Cardon, Greet and D'hooge, Roseline and Danneels, Lieven},
  issn         = {0362-2436},
  journal      = {SPINE},
  keyword      = {RADIOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS,ADULT VOLUNTEERS,RISK-FACTORS,RELIABILITY,IDIOPATHIC SCOLIOSIS,PELVIC ALIGNMENT,LUMBAR SPINE,SKIN-SURFACE DEVICE,Posture,development,LOW-BACK-PAIN,spinal pain,sagittal balance,YOUNG-ADULTS,spinopelvic alignment},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {19},
  pages        = {1657--1666},
  title        = {Sagittal standing posture and its association with spinal pain: a school-based epidemiological study of 1196 Flemish adolescents before age at peak height velocity},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BRS.0b013e3182408053},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Dolphens, Mieke, Barbara Cagnie, Pascal Coorevits, Guy Vanderstraeten, Greet Cardon, Roseline D’hooge, and Lieven Danneels. 2012. “Sagittal Standing Posture and Its Association with Spinal Pain: a School-based Epidemiological Study of 1196 Flemish Adolescents Before Age at Peak Height Velocity.” Spine 37 (19): 1657–1666.
APA
Dolphens, M., Cagnie, B., Coorevits, P., Vanderstraeten, G., Cardon, G., D’hooge, R., & Danneels, L. (2012). Sagittal standing posture and its association with spinal pain: a school-based epidemiological study of 1196 Flemish adolescents before age at peak height velocity. SPINE, 37(19), 1657–1666.
Vancouver
1.
Dolphens M, Cagnie B, Coorevits P, Vanderstraeten G, Cardon G, D’hooge R, et al. Sagittal standing posture and its association with spinal pain: a school-based epidemiological study of 1196 Flemish adolescents before age at peak height velocity. SPINE. 2012;37(19):1657–66.
MLA
Dolphens, Mieke, Barbara Cagnie, Pascal Coorevits, et al. “Sagittal Standing Posture and Its Association with Spinal Pain: a School-based Epidemiological Study of 1196 Flemish Adolescents Before Age at Peak Height Velocity.” SPINE 37.19 (2012): 1657–1666. Print.