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Human artistic behaviour: adaptation, byproduct, or cultural group selection?

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Organization
Abstract
Evolutionary accounts of art fall naturally into two categories: those that propose that art is an adaptation, and those that propose it is a byproduct of adaptations which evolved for different purposes. Although each of these positions can be supported by a wide range of empirical evidence, we will argue that there are shortcomings in each type of explanation. We will propose the alternative that the earliest art arose as a product of cultural group selection, drawing on theoretical models of altruism, anthropological observations of the use of art in extant small-scale societies and archaeological findings from Upper Palaeolithic Europe, in particular the Magdalenian cultural complex.

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Chicago
De Smedt, Johan, and Helen De Cruz. 2012. “Human Artistic Behaviour: Adaptation, Byproduct, or Cultural Group Selection?” In Philosophy of Behavioral Biology, ed. Kathryn S Plaisance and Thomas AC Reydon, 282 (4):167–187. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer.
APA
De Smedt, Johan, & De Cruz, H. (2012). Human artistic behaviour: adaptation, byproduct, or cultural group selection? In K. S. Plaisance & T. A. Reydon (Eds.), Philosophy of behavioral biology (Vol. 282 (4), pp. 167–187). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer.
Vancouver
1.
De Smedt J, De Cruz H. Human artistic behaviour: adaptation, byproduct, or cultural group selection? In: Plaisance KS, Reydon TA, editors. Philosophy of behavioral biology. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer; 2012. p. 167–87.
MLA
De Smedt, Johan, and Helen De Cruz. “Human Artistic Behaviour: Adaptation, Byproduct, or Cultural Group Selection?” Philosophy of Behavioral Biology. Ed. Kathryn S Plaisance & Thomas AC Reydon. Vol. 282 (4). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer, 2012. 167–187. Print.
@incollection{1949473,
  abstract     = {Evolutionary accounts of art fall naturally into two categories: those that propose that art is an adaptation, and those that propose it is a byproduct of adaptations which evolved for different purposes. Although each of these positions can be supported by a wide range of empirical evidence, we will argue that there are shortcomings in each type of explanation. We will propose the alternative that the earliest art arose as a product of cultural group selection, drawing on theoretical models of altruism, anthropological observations of the use of art in extant small-scale societies and archaeological findings from Upper Palaeolithic Europe, in particular the Magdalenian cultural complex.},
  author       = {De Smedt, Johan and De Cruz, Helen},
  booktitle    = {Philosophy of behavioral biology},
  editor       = {Plaisance, Kathryn S and Reydon, Thomas AC},
  isbn         = {9789400719507},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {167--187},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science},
  title        = {Human artistic behaviour: adaptation, byproduct, or cultural group selection?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-1951-4\_8},
  volume       = {282 (4)},
  year         = {2012},
}

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