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Meiofauna in canyon and channel systems – on how the local environment shapes nematode communities

Jeroen Ingels (UGent) and Ann Vanreusel (UGent)
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Abstract
It is recognised that productivity, flow, oxygen, sediment heterogeneity, and biotic disturbance are key factors that influence diversity and abundance patterns of deep-sea benthic fauna. Canyon sediments exhibit high organic loads and variable trophic conditions and variable frequency and intensity of disturbance events which may be used to explain benthic faunal patterns and associated processes. For this study, five deep-sea submarine canyons/channel systems and one slope area in the NE Atlantic were investigated with nematodes as a key group within the deep-sea meiobenthos. Differences in terms of standing stocks, diversity, trophic complexity and community structure were tested at different spatial scales. Community differences are mainly attributed to biogeochemical gradients along the vertical sediment profile rather than large-scale differences between canyons or water depths. Medium-scale heterogeneity was also considered important. Hydrodynamic regimes may have a profound influence on community structure and ecology and the link between trophic and structural diversity. The characteristics of the sedimentary organic matter regulate the community, which is adapted to the prevailing trophic conditions. Hydrodynamic disturbance interacted with the relation between nematode communities and the quality and quantity of organic matter, but local high organic loads and consequent enhanced oxygen consumption may disturb this relation

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Chicago
Ingels, Jeroen, and Ann Vanreusel. 2011. “Meiofauna in Canyon and Channel Systems – on How the Local Environment Shapes Nematode Communities.” In Our Oceans, Our Future : 2011 World Conference on Marine Biodiversity : Combined Abstract Booklet, 121–121.
APA
Ingels, Jeroen, & Vanreusel, A. (2011). Meiofauna in canyon and channel systems – on how the local environment shapes nematode communities. Our oceans, our future : 2011 world conference on marine biodiversity : combined abstract booklet (pp. 121–121). Presented at the 2nd World conference on Marine Biodiversity (WCMB 2011) : Our oceans, our future.
Vancouver
1.
Ingels J, Vanreusel A. Meiofauna in canyon and channel systems – on how the local environment shapes nematode communities. Our oceans, our future : 2011 world conference on marine biodiversity : combined abstract booklet. 2011. p. 121–121.
MLA
Ingels, Jeroen, and Ann Vanreusel. “Meiofauna in Canyon and Channel Systems – on How the Local Environment Shapes Nematode Communities.” Our Oceans, Our Future : 2011 World Conference on Marine Biodiversity : Combined Abstract Booklet. 2011. 121–121. Print.
@inproceedings{1946892,
  abstract     = {It is recognised that productivity, flow, oxygen, sediment heterogeneity, and biotic disturbance are key factors that influence diversity and abundance patterns of deep-sea benthic fauna. Canyon sediments exhibit high organic loads and variable trophic conditions and variable frequency and intensity of disturbance events which may be used to explain benthic faunal patterns and associated processes. For this study, five deep-sea submarine canyons/channel systems and one slope area in the NE Atlantic were investigated with nematodes as a key group within the deep-sea meiobenthos. Differences in terms of standing stocks, diversity, trophic complexity and community structure were tested at different spatial scales. Community differences are mainly attributed to biogeochemical gradients along the vertical sediment profile rather than large-scale differences between canyons or water depths. Medium-scale heterogeneity was also considered important. Hydrodynamic regimes may have a profound influence on community structure and ecology and the link between trophic and structural diversity. The characteristics of the sedimentary organic matter regulate the community, which is adapted to the prevailing trophic conditions. Hydrodynamic disturbance interacted with the relation between nematode communities and the quality and quantity of organic matter, but local high organic loads and consequent enhanced oxygen consumption may disturb this relation},
  articleno    = {abstract 33/0867},
  author       = {Ingels, Jeroen and Vanreusel, Ann},
  booktitle    = {Our oceans, our future : 2011 world conference on marine biodiversity : combined abstract booklet},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Aberdeen, Scotland, UK},
  pages        = {abstract 33/0867:121--abstract 33/0867:121},
  title        = {Meiofauna in canyon and channel systems -- on how the local environment shapes nematode communities},
  url          = {http://www.marine-biodiversity.org/uploads/files/WCMB-2011.pdf},
  year         = {2011},
}