Advanced search
1 file | 143.17 KB

Post-conflict slowing: cognitive adaptation after conflict processing

Author
Organization
Project
The integrative neuroscience of behavioral control (Neuroscience)
Abstract
The aftereffects of error and conflict (i.e., stimulus or response incongruency) have been extensively studied in the cognitive control literature. Each has been characterized by its own behavioral signature on the following trial. Conflict leads to a reduced congruency effect (Gratton effect), whereas an error leads to increased response time (post-error slowing). The reason for this dissociation has remained unclear. Here, we show that post-conflict slowing is not typically observed because it is masked by the processing of the irrelevant stimulus dimension. We demonstrate that post-conflict slowing does occur when tested in pure trials where helpful or detrimental impacts from irrelevant stimulus dimensions are removed (i.e., univalent stimuli).
Keywords
Simon task, Cognitive control, Post-error slowing, TASK, ACCOUNT, ACTIVATION

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 143.17 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Verguts, Tom, Wim Notebaert, Wilfried Kunde, and Peter Wühr. 2011. “Post-conflict Slowing: Cognitive Adaptation After Conflict Processing.” Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 18 (1): 76–82.
APA
Verguts, Tom, Notebaert, W., Kunde, W., & Wühr, P. (2011). Post-conflict slowing: cognitive adaptation after conflict processing. PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN & REVIEW, 18(1), 76–82.
Vancouver
1.
Verguts T, Notebaert W, Kunde W, Wühr P. Post-conflict slowing: cognitive adaptation after conflict processing. PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN & REVIEW. 2011;18(1):76–82.
MLA
Verguts, Tom, Wim Notebaert, Wilfried Kunde, et al. “Post-conflict Slowing: Cognitive Adaptation After Conflict Processing.” PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN & REVIEW 18.1 (2011): 76–82. Print.
@article{1944008,
  abstract     = {The aftereffects of error and conflict (i.e., stimulus or response incongruency) have been extensively studied in the cognitive control literature. Each has been characterized by its own behavioral signature on the following trial. Conflict leads to a reduced congruency effect (Gratton effect), whereas an error leads to increased response time (post-error slowing). The reason for this dissociation has remained unclear. Here, we show that post-conflict slowing is not typically observed because it is masked by the processing of the irrelevant stimulus dimension. We demonstrate that post-conflict slowing does occur when tested in pure trials where helpful or detrimental impacts from irrelevant stimulus dimensions are removed (i.e., univalent stimuli).},
  author       = {Verguts, Tom and Notebaert, Wim and Kunde, Wilfried and Wühr, Peter},
  issn         = {1069-9384},
  journal      = {PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN & REVIEW},
  keywords     = {Simon task,Cognitive control,Post-error slowing,TASK,ACCOUNT,ACTIVATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {76--82},
  title        = {Post-conflict slowing: cognitive adaptation after conflict processing},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13423-010-0016-2},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2011},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: