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Clinical practice: vegetarian infant and child nutrition

Myriam Van Winckel UGent, SASKIA VANDE VELDE UGent, RUTH DE BRUYNE UGent and Stephanie Van Biervliet UGent (2011) EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS. 170(12). p.1489-1494
abstract
The aim of this review is to give insight on the benefits and risks of vegetarianism, with special emphasis on vegetarian child nutrition. This eating pattern excluding meat and fish is being adopted by a growing number of people. A vegetarian diet has been shown to be associated with lower mortality of ischaemic heart disease and lower prevalence of obesity. Growth in children on a vegetarian diet including dairy has been shown to be similar to omnivorous peers. Although vegetarianism in adolescents is associated with eating disorders, there is no proof of a causal relation, as the eating disorder generally precedes the exclusion of meat from the diet. A well-balanced lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, including dairy products, can satisfy all nutritional needs of the growing child. In contrast, a vegan diet, excluding all animal food sources, has at least to be supplemented with vitamin B(12), with special attention to adequate intakes of calcium and zinc and energy-dense foods containing enough high-quality protein for young children. The more restricted the diet and the younger the child, the greater the risk for deficiencies.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
EPIC-OXFORD, HEALTH-BENEFITS, MACROBIOTIC DIET, Vegetarianism, Child nutrition, Vitamin B(12), Protein quality, PLANNING VEGAN DIETS, AGED 7-11 YEARS, VITAMIN-B-12 DEFICIENCY, BONE MASS, GROWTH, ADOLESCENTS, MEAT
journal title
EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS
Eur. J. Pediatr.
volume
170
issue
12
pages
1489 - 1494
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000298657000001
JCR category
PEDIATRICS
JCR impact factor
1.879 (2011)
JCR rank
39/113 (2011)
JCR quartile
2 (2011)
ISSN
0340-6199
DOI
10.1007/s00431-011-1547-x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1939539
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1939539
date created
2011-11-07 16:50:39
date last changed
2012-04-12 17:21:37
@article{1939539,
  abstract     = {The aim of this review is to give insight on the benefits and risks of vegetarianism, with special emphasis on vegetarian child nutrition. This eating pattern excluding meat and fish is being adopted by a growing number of people. A vegetarian diet has been shown to be associated with lower mortality of ischaemic heart disease and lower prevalence of obesity. Growth in children on a vegetarian diet including dairy has been shown to be similar to omnivorous peers. Although vegetarianism in adolescents is associated with eating disorders, there is no proof of a causal relation, as the eating disorder generally precedes the exclusion of meat from the diet. A well-balanced lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, including dairy products, can satisfy all nutritional needs of the growing child. In contrast, a vegan diet, excluding all animal food sources, has at least to be supplemented with vitamin B(12), with special attention to adequate intakes of calcium and zinc and energy-dense foods containing enough high-quality protein for young children. The more restricted the diet and the younger the child, the greater the risk for deficiencies.},
  author       = {Van Winckel, Myriam and VANDE VELDE, SASKIA and DE BRUYNE, RUTH and Van Biervliet, Stephanie},
  issn         = {0340-6199},
  journal      = {EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS},
  keyword      = {EPIC-OXFORD,HEALTH-BENEFITS,MACROBIOTIC DIET,Vegetarianism,Child nutrition,Vitamin B(12),Protein quality,PLANNING VEGAN DIETS,AGED 7-11 YEARS,VITAMIN-B-12 DEFICIENCY,BONE MASS,GROWTH,ADOLESCENTS,MEAT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {1489--1494},
  title        = {Clinical practice: vegetarian infant and child nutrition},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00431-011-1547-x},
  volume       = {170},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Van Winckel, Myriam, Saskia Vande Velde, Ruth De Bruyne, and Stephanie Van Biervliet. 2011. “Clinical Practice: Vegetarian Infant and Child Nutrition.” European Journal of Pediatrics 170 (12): 1489–1494.
APA
Van Winckel, M., Vande Velde, S., De Bruyne, R., & Van Biervliet, S. (2011). Clinical practice: vegetarian infant and child nutrition. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS, 170(12), 1489–1494.
Vancouver
1.
Van Winckel M, Vande Velde S, De Bruyne R, Van Biervliet S. Clinical practice: vegetarian infant and child nutrition. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS. 2011;170(12):1489–94.
MLA
Van Winckel, Myriam, Saskia Vande Velde, Ruth De Bruyne, et al. “Clinical Practice: Vegetarian Infant and Child Nutrition.” EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS 170.12 (2011): 1489–1494. Print.