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Propionate absorbed from the colon acts as gluconeogenic substrate in a strict carnivore, the domestic cat (Felis catus)

Adronie Verbrugghe UGent, Myriam Hesta UGent, Sylvie Daminet UGent, Ingeborgh Polis UGent, Jens Juul Holst, Johan Buyse, Birgit Wuyts UGent and Geert Janssens UGent (2012) JOURNAL OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY AND ANIMAL NUTRITION. 96(6). p.1054-1064
abstract
In six normal-weight and six obese cats, the metabolic effect of propionate absorbed from the colon was assessed. Two colonic infusions were tested in a crossover design with intervals of 4 weeks. The test solution contained 4 mmol sodium propionate per kg ideal body weight in a 0.2% NaCl solution. Normal saline was given as control solution. Solutions were infused into the hindgut over 30 min. Blood samples were obtained prior to and at various time points after starting the infusion. As body condition did not affect evaluated parameters, all data were pooled. Plasma glucose concentrations showed differences neither over time nor during or after infusion with propionate or control. Plasma amino acid concentrations rose over time (p < 0.001), but were similar for both infusions. Plasma propionylcarnitine rose markedly towards the end of the propionate infusion and decreased afterwards (p < 0.001), whereas 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutarylcarnitine was lower 30 (p = 0.005) and 60 min (p = 0.032) after ending propionate infusions and acetylcarnitine tended to fall at the same time points (p = 0.079; p = 0.080), suggesting inhibition of gluconeogenesis from pyruvate and amino acids, but initiation of propionate-induced gluconeogenesis. In conclusion, propionate absorbed from the colon is hypothesized to act as gluconeogenic substrate, regardless of the cat's body condition.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
amino acid metabolism, acylcarnitine profile, glucose metabolism, cat, propionate, gluconeogenesis, GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDE-1, CHAIN FATTY-ACIDS, HEPATIC GLUCOSE-PRODUCTION, PERFUSED RAT-LIVER, LIPID-METABOLISM, DIETARY PROPIONATE, MESSENGER-RNA, OLIGOFRUCTOSE, FERMENTATION, EXPRESSION
journal title
JOURNAL OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY AND ANIMAL NUTRITION
J. Anim. Physiol. Anim. Nutr.
volume
96
issue
6
pages
1054 - 1064
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000314234700013
JCR category
AGRICULTURE, DAIRY & ANIMAL SCIENCE
JCR impact factor
1.254 (2012)
JCR rank
15/54 (2012)
JCR quartile
2 (2012)
ISSN
0931-2439
DOI
10.1111/j.1439-0396.2011.01220.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1934377
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1934377
date created
2011-10-21 15:45:50
date last changed
2013-07-09 10:40:15
@article{1934377,
  abstract     = {In six normal-weight and six obese cats, the metabolic effect of propionate absorbed from the colon was assessed. Two colonic infusions were tested in a crossover design with intervals of 4 weeks. The test solution contained 4 mmol sodium propionate per kg ideal body weight in a 0.2\% NaCl solution. Normal saline was given as control solution. Solutions were infused into the hindgut over 30 min. Blood samples were obtained prior to and at various time points after starting the infusion. As body condition did not affect evaluated parameters, all data were pooled. Plasma glucose concentrations showed differences neither over time nor during or after infusion with propionate or control. Plasma amino acid concentrations rose over time (p {\textlangle} 0.001), but were similar for both infusions. Plasma propionylcarnitine rose markedly towards the end of the propionate infusion and decreased afterwards (p {\textlangle} 0.001), whereas 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutarylcarnitine was lower 30 (p = 0.005) and 60 min (p = 0.032) after ending propionate infusions and acetylcarnitine tended to fall at the same time points (p = 0.079; p = 0.080), suggesting inhibition of gluconeogenesis from pyruvate and amino acids, but initiation of propionate-induced gluconeogenesis. In conclusion, propionate absorbed from the colon is hypothesized to act as gluconeogenic substrate, regardless of the cat's body condition.},
  author       = {Verbrugghe, Adronie and Hesta, Myriam and Daminet, Sylvie and Polis, Ingeborgh and Holst, Jens Juul and Buyse, Johan and Wuyts, Birgit and Janssens, Geert},
  issn         = {0931-2439},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY AND ANIMAL NUTRITION},
  keyword      = {amino acid metabolism,acylcarnitine profile,glucose metabolism,cat,propionate,gluconeogenesis,GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDE-1,CHAIN FATTY-ACIDS,HEPATIC GLUCOSE-PRODUCTION,PERFUSED RAT-LIVER,LIPID-METABOLISM,DIETARY PROPIONATE,MESSENGER-RNA,OLIGOFRUCTOSE,FERMENTATION,EXPRESSION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1054--1064},
  title        = {Propionate absorbed from the colon acts as gluconeogenic substrate in a strict carnivore, the domestic cat (Felis catus)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0396.2011.01220.x},
  volume       = {96},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Verbrugghe, Adronie, Myriam Hesta, Sylvie Daminet, Ingeborgh Polis, Jens Juul Holst, Johan Buyse, BIRGIT WUYTS, and Geert Janssens. 2012. “Propionate Absorbed from the Colon Acts as Gluconeogenic Substrate in a Strict Carnivore, the Domestic Cat (Felis Catus).” Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition 96 (6): 1054–1064.
APA
Verbrugghe, A., Hesta, M., Daminet, S., Polis, I., Holst, J. J., Buyse, J., WUYTS, B., et al. (2012). Propionate absorbed from the colon acts as gluconeogenic substrate in a strict carnivore, the domestic cat (Felis catus). JOURNAL OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY AND ANIMAL NUTRITION, 96(6), 1054–1064.
Vancouver
1.
Verbrugghe A, Hesta M, Daminet S, Polis I, Holst JJ, Buyse J, et al. Propionate absorbed from the colon acts as gluconeogenic substrate in a strict carnivore, the domestic cat (Felis catus). JOURNAL OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY AND ANIMAL NUTRITION. 2012;96(6):1054–64.
MLA
Verbrugghe, Adronie, Myriam Hesta, Sylvie Daminet, et al. “Propionate Absorbed from the Colon Acts as Gluconeogenic Substrate in a Strict Carnivore, the Domestic Cat (Felis Catus).” JOURNAL OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY AND ANIMAL NUTRITION 96.6 (2012): 1054–1064. Print.