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Distribution of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species from milk and environment of dairy cows differs between herds

Veerle Piessens UGent, E Van Coillie, Bert Verbist UGent, Karlien Supré UGent, G Braem, A Van Nuffel, L De Vuyst, Marc Heyndrickx UGent and Sarne De Vliegher UGent (2011) JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE. 94(6). p.2933-2944
abstract
In many parts of the world, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are the predominant pathogens causing intramammary infections (IMI) in dairy cows. The cows' environment is thought to be a possible source for CNS mastitis and this was investigated in the present paper. A longitudinal field study was carried out in 6 well-managed dairy herds to determine the distribution and epidemiology of various CNS species isolated from milk, causing DM and living freely in the cows' environment, respectively. In each herd, quarter milk samples from a cohort of 10 lactating cows and environmental samples from stall air, slatted floor, sawdust from cubicles, and sawdust stock were collected monthly (n = 13). Isolates from quarter milk samples (n = 134) and the environment (n = 637) were identified to species level using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) genotyping. Staphylococcus chromogenes, S. haemolyticus, S. epidermidis, and S. simulans accounted for 81.3% of all CNS milk isolates. Quarters were considered infected with CNS (positive IMI status) only when 2 out of 3 consecutive milk samples yielded the same CNS AFLP type. The species causing IMI were S. chromogenes (n = 35 samples with positive IMI status), S. haemolyticus (n = 29), S. simulans (n = 14), and S. epidermidis (n = 6). The observed persistent IMI cases (n = 17) had a mean duration of 149.4 d (range 63.0 to 329.8 d). The CNS species predominating in the environment were S. eguorum, S. sciuri, S. haemolyticus, and S. fleurettii. Herd-to-herd differences in distribution of CNS species were observed in both milk and the environment, suggesting that herd-level factors are involved in the establishment of particular species in a dairy herd. Primary reservoirs of the species causing IMI varied. Staphylococcus chromogenes and S. epidermidis were rarely found in the environment, indicating that other reservoirs were more important in their epidemiology. For S. haemolyticus and S. simulans, the environment was found as a reservoir, suggesting that IMI with these species were possibly environmental in origin.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
coagulase-negative staphylococci, amplified fragment length polymorphism, environment, cow milk, BOVINE SUBCLINICAL MASTITIS, INTRAMAMMARY INFECTIONS, CLINICAL MASTITIS, MAMMARY-GLAND, ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY, HEIFER MASTITIS, MAJOR PATHOGENS, MINOR PATHOGENS, EARLY LACTATION, PREVALENCE
journal title
JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE
J. Dairy Sci.
volume
94
issue
6
pages
2933 - 2944
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000290777800028
JCR category
AGRICULTURE, DAIRY & ANIMAL SCIENCE
JCR impact factor
2.564 (2011)
JCR rank
2/54 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
0022-0302
DOI
10.3168/jds.2010-3956
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I don't know the status of the copyright for this publication
id
1930497
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1930497
date created
2011-10-17 14:04:29
date last changed
2011-10-18 11:05:52
@article{1930497,
  abstract     = {In many parts of the world, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are the predominant pathogens causing intramammary infections (IMI) in dairy cows. The cows' environment is thought to be a possible source for CNS mastitis and this was investigated in the present paper. A longitudinal field study was carried out in 6 well-managed dairy herds to determine the distribution and epidemiology of various CNS species isolated from milk, causing DM and living freely in the cows' environment, respectively. In each herd, quarter milk samples from a cohort of 10 lactating cows and environmental samples from stall air, slatted floor, sawdust from cubicles, and sawdust stock were collected monthly (n = 13). Isolates from quarter milk samples (n = 134) and the environment (n = 637) were identified to species level using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) genotyping. Staphylococcus chromogenes, S. haemolyticus, S. epidermidis, and S. simulans accounted for 81.3\% of all CNS milk isolates. Quarters were considered infected with CNS (positive IMI status) only when 2 out of 3 consecutive milk samples yielded the same CNS AFLP type. The species causing IMI were S. chromogenes (n = 35 samples with positive IMI status), S. haemolyticus (n = 29), S. simulans (n = 14), and S. epidermidis (n = 6). The observed persistent IMI cases (n = 17) had a mean duration of 149.4 d (range 63.0 to 329.8 d). The CNS species predominating in the environment were S. eguorum, S. sciuri, S. haemolyticus, and S. fleurettii. Herd-to-herd differences in distribution of CNS species were observed in both milk and the environment, suggesting that herd-level factors are involved in the establishment of particular species in a dairy herd. Primary reservoirs of the species causing IMI varied. Staphylococcus chromogenes and S. epidermidis were rarely found in the environment, indicating that other reservoirs were more important in their epidemiology. For S. haemolyticus and S. simulans, the environment was found as a reservoir, suggesting that IMI with these species were possibly environmental in origin.},
  author       = {Piessens, Veerle and Van Coillie, E and Verbist, Bert and Supr{\'e}, Karlien and Braem, G and Van Nuffel, A and De Vuyst, L and Heyndrickx, Marc and De Vliegher, Sarne},
  issn         = {0022-0302},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE},
  keyword      = {coagulase-negative staphylococci,amplified fragment length polymorphism,environment,cow milk,BOVINE SUBCLINICAL MASTITIS,INTRAMAMMARY INFECTIONS,CLINICAL MASTITIS,MAMMARY-GLAND,ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY,HEIFER MASTITIS,MAJOR PATHOGENS,MINOR PATHOGENS,EARLY LACTATION,PREVALENCE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {2933--2944},
  title        = {Distribution of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species from milk and environment of dairy cows differs between herds},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3168/jds.2010-3956},
  volume       = {94},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Piessens, Veerle, E Van Coillie, Bert Verbist, Karlien Supré, G Braem, A Van Nuffel, L De Vuyst, Marc Heyndrickx, and Sarne De Vliegher. 2011. “Distribution of Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus Species from Milk and Environment of Dairy Cows Differs Between Herds.” Journal of Dairy Science 94 (6): 2933–2944.
APA
Piessens, V., Van Coillie, E., Verbist, B., Supré, K., Braem, G., Van Nuffel, A., De Vuyst, L., et al. (2011). Distribution of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species from milk and environment of dairy cows differs between herds. JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE, 94(6), 2933–2944.
Vancouver
1.
Piessens V, Van Coillie E, Verbist B, Supré K, Braem G, Van Nuffel A, et al. Distribution of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species from milk and environment of dairy cows differs between herds. JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE. 2011;94(6):2933–44.
MLA
Piessens, Veerle, E Van Coillie, Bert Verbist, et al. “Distribution of Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus Species from Milk and Environment of Dairy Cows Differs Between Herds.” JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE 94.6 (2011): 2933–2944. Print.