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Brief reports: anticipating the consequences of action: an fMRI study of intention-based task preparation

(2010) PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY. 47(6). p.1019-1027
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Abstract
A key component of task preparation may be to anticipate the consequences of task-appropriate actions. This task switching study examined whether such type of "intentional" preparatory control relies on the presentation of explicit action effects. Preparatory BOLD activation in a condition with task-specific motion effect feedback was compared to identical task conditions with accuracy feedback only. Switch-related activation was found selectively in the effect feedback condition in the middle mid-frontal gyrus and in the anterior intraparietal sulcus. Consistent with research on attentional control, the posterior superior parietal lobule exhibited switch-related preparatory activation irrespective of feedback type. To conclude, preparatory control can occur via complementary attentional and intentional neural mechanisms depending on whether meaningful task-specific action effects lead to the formation of explicit effect representations.
Keywords
DORSOLATERAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX, MEDIAL FRONTAL-CORTEX, COGNITIVE CONTROL, FUNCTIONAL MRI, WILLED ACTION, MECHANISMS, ATTENTION, SELECTION, AREAS, MAINTENANCE, Action selection, Action effects, Attention, Cognitive control, Task switching

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Ruge, Hannes, Sven Müller, and Todd Braver. 2010. “Brief Reports: Anticipating the Consequences of Action: An fMRI Study of Intention-based Task Preparation.” Psychophysiology 47 (6): 1019–1027.
APA
Ruge, H., Müller, S., & Braver, T. (2010). Brief reports: anticipating the consequences of action: an fMRI study of intention-based task preparation. PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY, 47(6), 1019–1027.
Vancouver
1.
Ruge H, Müller S, Braver T. Brief reports: anticipating the consequences of action: an fMRI study of intention-based task preparation. PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY. 2010;47(6):1019–27.
MLA
Ruge, Hannes, Sven Müller, and Todd Braver. “Brief Reports: Anticipating the Consequences of Action: An fMRI Study of Intention-based Task Preparation.” PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY 47.6 (2010): 1019–1027. Print.
@article{1929242,
  abstract     = {A key component of task preparation may be to anticipate the consequences of task-appropriate actions. This task switching study examined whether such type of "intentional" preparatory control relies on the presentation of explicit action effects. Preparatory BOLD activation in a condition with task-specific motion effect feedback was compared to identical task conditions with accuracy feedback only. Switch-related activation was found selectively in the effect feedback condition in the middle mid-frontal gyrus and in the anterior intraparietal sulcus. Consistent with research on attentional control, the posterior superior parietal lobule exhibited switch-related preparatory activation irrespective of feedback type. To conclude, preparatory control can occur via complementary attentional and intentional neural mechanisms depending on whether meaningful task-specific action effects lead to the formation of explicit effect representations.},
  author       = {Ruge, Hannes and Müller, Sven and Braver, Todd},
  issn         = {0048-5772},
  journal      = {PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY},
  keywords     = {DORSOLATERAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX,MEDIAL FRONTAL-CORTEX,COGNITIVE CONTROL,FUNCTIONAL MRI,WILLED ACTION,MECHANISMS,ATTENTION,SELECTION,AREAS,MAINTENANCE,Action selection,Action effects,Attention,Cognitive control,Task switching},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1019--1027},
  title        = {Brief reports: anticipating the consequences of action: an fMRI study of intention-based task preparation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8986.2010.01027.x},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2010},
}

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