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Fat crystallization and partial coalescence in dairy creams: role of monoacylglycerols

(2011)
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(UGent)
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Abstract
Dairy cream is a fat-rich fluid milk product and can, from a microstructural point of view, be described as an oil-in-water emulsion. The so-called milk fat globules in cream, derived from fresh milk, contain the milk lipids and are dispersed in a continuous aqueous skimmed milk phase. Cream can be further processed into whipped cream which is a rigid dairy foam that is often used as a topping for desserts, cakes and ice creams. During whipping air is introduced in the cream and the milk fat globules destabilize by means of a partial coalescence mechanism due to the presence of fat crystals in the milk fat globules. In order to obtain a high-quality whipped cream with desired physicochemical and sensory properties (overrun, stability, firmness, creaminess, etc.), the partial coalescence rate needs to be controlled and a substantial amount of fat seems to be indispensible. Monoacylglycerols (MAGs), being small-molecule surfactants, may govern the partial coalescence rate and, hence, the whipping properties of cream since they are known to change the fat globule size, the oil-water interfacial properties and the fat crystallization behavior of oil-in-water emulsions. However, an elaborate study that surveys the effect of different types of MAGs and a well-funded mechanistic explanation of their effects in dairy whipping cream is still lacking. This manuscript consists of two parts. Part I deals with the milk fat crystallization which is an essential process preceding partial coalescence and Part II addresses partial coalescence with and without air inclusion in natural and recombined dairy creams. Throughout both parts, the effects of MAGs were extensively surveyed with the intention of, firstly, getting more fundamental insight in the mechanism clarifying the effect of different MAGs on milk fat crystallization and partial coalescence of recombined cream and on their whipping properties and, secondly, exploring the potentials of MAGs to improve the physicochemical properties of dairy recombined whipped creams.
Keywords
partial coalescence, whipped cream, cream, Fat crystallization, monoacylglycerols

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Fredrick, Eveline. 2011. “Fat Crystallization and Partial Coalescence in Dairy Creams: Role of Monoacylglycerols”. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering.
APA
Fredrick, E. (2011). Fat crystallization and partial coalescence in dairy creams: role of monoacylglycerols. Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent, Belgium.
Vancouver
1.
Fredrick E. Fat crystallization and partial coalescence in dairy creams: role of monoacylglycerols. [Ghent, Belgium]: Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering; 2011.
MLA
Fredrick, Eveline. “Fat Crystallization and Partial Coalescence in Dairy Creams: Role of Monoacylglycerols.” 2011 : n. pag. Print.
@phdthesis{1923936,
  abstract     = {Dairy cream is a fat-rich fluid milk product and can, from a microstructural point of view, be described as an oil-in-water emulsion. The so-called milk fat globules in cream, derived from fresh milk, contain the milk lipids and are dispersed in a continuous aqueous skimmed milk phase. Cream can be further processed into whipped cream which is a rigid dairy foam that is often used as a topping for desserts, cakes and ice creams. During whipping air is introduced in the cream and the milk fat globules destabilize by means of a partial coalescence mechanism due to the presence of fat crystals in the milk fat globules. In order to obtain a high-quality whipped cream with desired physicochemical and sensory properties (overrun, stability, firmness, creaminess, etc.), the partial coalescence rate needs to be controlled and a substantial amount of fat seems to be indispensible. Monoacylglycerols (MAGs), being small-molecule surfactants, may govern the partial coalescence rate and, hence, the whipping properties of cream since they are known to change the fat globule size, the oil-water interfacial properties and the fat crystallization behavior of oil-in-water emulsions. However, an elaborate study that surveys the effect of different types of MAGs and a well-funded mechanistic explanation of their effects in dairy whipping cream is still lacking. 
This manuscript consists of two parts. Part I deals with the milk fat crystallization which is an essential process preceding partial coalescence and Part II addresses partial coalescence with and without air inclusion in natural and recombined dairy creams. Throughout both parts, the effects of MAGs were extensively surveyed with the intention of, firstly, getting more fundamental insight in the mechanism clarifying the effect of different MAGs on milk fat crystallization and partial coalescence of recombined cream and on their whipping properties and, secondly, exploring the potentials of MAGs to improve the physicochemical properties of dairy recombined whipped creams.},
  author       = {Fredrick, Eveline},
  isbn         = {9789059894693},
  keyword      = {partial coalescence,whipped cream,cream,Fat crystallization,monoacylglycerols},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {XXVII, 203},
  publisher    = {Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering},
  school       = {Ghent University},
  title        = {Fat crystallization and partial coalescence in dairy creams: role of monoacylglycerols},
  year         = {2011},
}