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Static and dynamic visuomotor task performance in children with acquired brain injury: predictive control deficits under increased temporal pressure

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Abstract
Objective: To compare performance of children with acquired brain injury (AB I) on static versus dynamic visuornotor tasks with that of control children. Participants: Twenty-eight children with ABI and 28 normal age- and gender-matched controls (aged 6-16 years). Main Measures: Two visuornotor tasks on a digitizing tablet: (1) a static motor task requiring tracing of a flower figure and (2) a dynamic task consisting of tracking an accelerating dot presented on a monitor. Results: Children with ABI performed worse than the control group only during the dynamic tracking task; the duration within the target was shorter, the distance between the centers of cursor and target was larger, and the number of velocity peaks per centimeter and the number of stops (ie, the number of submovements) were higher than those of the control group. Rather than resulting from movement execution problems, this might be due to less adequate processing of fast incoming sensory information, resulting in a decreased ability to anticipate the movement of the target (predictive control). Conclusion: Deficits in eye-hand coordination require careful attention, even in the postinjury chronic phase.
Keywords
acquired brain injury, anticipation, children, brain damage, eye-hand coordination, IMAGERY, MODERATE, VALIDITY, DISORDERS, RECOVERY, RELIABILITY, MANUAL TRACKING, MOTOR-PERFORMANCE, CLOSED-HEAD INJURY, MOVEMENT ASSESSMENT BATTERY, manual pursuit, motor control

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Chicago
Caeyenberghs, Karen, Dominique van Roon, Katrijn van Aken, Paul De Cock, Catharine Vander Linden, Stephan P Swinnen, and Bouwien CM Smits-Engelsman. 2009. “Static and Dynamic Visuomotor Task Performance in Children with Acquired Brain Injury: Predictive Control Deficits Under Increased Temporal Pressure.” Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation 24 (5): 363–373.
APA
Caeyenberghs, Karen, van Roon, D., van Aken, K., De Cock, P., Vander Linden, C., Swinnen, S. P., & Smits-Engelsman, B. C. (2009). Static and dynamic visuomotor task performance in children with acquired brain injury: predictive control deficits under increased temporal pressure. JOURNAL OF HEAD TRAUMA REHABILITATION, 24(5), 363–373.
Vancouver
1.
Caeyenberghs K, van Roon D, van Aken K, De Cock P, Vander Linden C, Swinnen SP, et al. Static and dynamic visuomotor task performance in children with acquired brain injury: predictive control deficits under increased temporal pressure. JOURNAL OF HEAD TRAUMA REHABILITATION. 2009;24(5):363–73.
MLA
Caeyenberghs, Karen, Dominique van Roon, Katrijn van Aken, et al. “Static and Dynamic Visuomotor Task Performance in Children with Acquired Brain Injury: Predictive Control Deficits Under Increased Temporal Pressure.” JOURNAL OF HEAD TRAUMA REHABILITATION 24.5 (2009): 363–373. Print.
@article{1920497,
  abstract     = {Objective: To compare performance of children with acquired brain injury (AB I) on static versus dynamic visuornotor tasks with that of control children. Participants: Twenty-eight children with ABI and 28 normal age- and gender-matched controls (aged 6-16 years). Main Measures: Two visuornotor tasks on a digitizing tablet: (1) a static motor task requiring tracing of a flower figure and (2) a dynamic task consisting of tracking an accelerating dot presented on a monitor. Results: Children with ABI performed worse than the control group only during the dynamic tracking task; the duration within the target was shorter, the distance between the centers of cursor and target was larger, and the number of velocity peaks per centimeter and the number of stops (ie, the number of submovements) were higher than those of the control group. Rather than resulting from movement execution problems, this might be due to less adequate processing of fast incoming sensory information, resulting in a decreased ability to anticipate the movement of the target (predictive control). Conclusion: Deficits in eye-hand coordination require careful attention, even in the postinjury chronic phase.},
  author       = {Caeyenberghs, Karen and van Roon, Dominique and van Aken, Katrijn and De Cock, Paul and Vander Linden, Catharine and Swinnen, Stephan P and Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien CM},
  issn         = {0885-9701},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF HEAD TRAUMA REHABILITATION},
  keyword      = {acquired brain injury,anticipation,children,brain damage,eye-hand coordination,IMAGERY,MODERATE,VALIDITY,DISORDERS,RECOVERY,RELIABILITY,MANUAL TRACKING,MOTOR-PERFORMANCE,CLOSED-HEAD INJURY,MOVEMENT ASSESSMENT BATTERY,manual pursuit,motor control},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {363--373},
  title        = {Static and dynamic visuomotor task performance in children with acquired brain injury: predictive control deficits under increased temporal pressure},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0b013e3181af0810},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2009},
}

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