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Dietary supplementation with dimethylglycine affects broiler performance and plasma metabolites depending on dose and dietary fatty acid profile

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Abstract
The effect of dietary supplementation with N,N-dimethylglycine sodium salt (Na-DMG) was evaluated in a feeding trial with 1500 1-day-old broiler chicks (Cobb 500). DMG was supplemented at 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 or 1 g Na-DMG/kg feed to a ration with either animal fat (chicken fat) or vegetal fat (soy oil) as main fat source. In the vegetal fat diets, production value was significantly linearly improved by supplementation with DMG up to 11%. Irrespective of dietary fat source, abdominal fat percentage was significantly linearly reduced up to 24% and meat yield tended to increase linearly with DMG level up to 4%. In the vegetal fat groups, DMG significantly lowered abdominal fat pad by up to 38% and tended to increase meat yield up to 6% at the highest dose. Fasted non-esterified fatty acid level significantly decreased with increasing DMG level up to 36% and thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) decreased with a statistical trend up to 46% at the highest dose. In vegetal fat diets, addition of DMG resulted in significant lower TBARS level by 56% at the highest dose. Finally, a significant quadratic effect on ascites heart index was present in the vegetal fat diets, with a minimal value at 0.5 g Na-DMG/kg. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with DMG may improve technical and slaughter performance, and may reduce oxidative stress and pulmonary hypertension, but the degree of effects is modulated by fatty acid profile of the diet. Herewith, effects are more pronounced in a diet rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids compared with a diet rich in saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids.
Keywords
FISH-OIL, HYPERTENSION, RESISTANCE, VITAMIN-E, dose-response, ascites, dimethylglycine, performance, supplementation, nutrition, broiler

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Chicago
Kalmar, Isabelle, An Cools, Martin WA Verstegen, Gerard Huyghebaert, Johan Buyse, Peter Roose, and Geert Janssens. 2011. “Dietary Supplementation with Dimethylglycine Affects Broiler Performance and Plasma Metabolites Depending on Dose and Dietary Fatty Acid Profile.” Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition 95 (2): 146–153.
APA
Kalmar, I., Cools, A., Verstegen, M. W., Huyghebaert, G., Buyse, J., Roose, P., & Janssens, G. (2011). Dietary supplementation with dimethylglycine affects broiler performance and plasma metabolites depending on dose and dietary fatty acid profile. JOURNAL OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY AND ANIMAL NUTRITION, 95(2), 146–153.
Vancouver
1.
Kalmar I, Cools A, Verstegen MW, Huyghebaert G, Buyse J, Roose P, et al. Dietary supplementation with dimethylglycine affects broiler performance and plasma metabolites depending on dose and dietary fatty acid profile. JOURNAL OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY AND ANIMAL NUTRITION. 2011;95(2):146–53.
MLA
Kalmar, Isabelle, An Cools, Martin WA Verstegen, et al. “Dietary Supplementation with Dimethylglycine Affects Broiler Performance and Plasma Metabolites Depending on Dose and Dietary Fatty Acid Profile.” JOURNAL OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY AND ANIMAL NUTRITION 95.2 (2011): 146–153. Print.
@article{1919382,
  abstract     = {The effect of dietary supplementation with N,N-dimethylglycine sodium salt (Na-DMG) was evaluated in a feeding trial with 1500 1-day-old broiler chicks (Cobb 500). DMG was supplemented at 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 or 1 g Na-DMG/kg feed to a ration with either animal fat (chicken fat) or vegetal fat (soy oil) as main fat source. In the vegetal fat diets, production value was significantly linearly improved by supplementation with DMG up to 11\%. Irrespective of dietary fat source, abdominal fat percentage was significantly linearly reduced up to 24\% and meat yield tended to increase linearly with DMG level up to 4\%. In the vegetal fat groups, DMG significantly lowered abdominal fat pad by up to 38\% and tended to increase meat yield up to 6\% at the highest dose. Fasted non-esterified fatty acid level significantly decreased with increasing DMG level up to 36\% and thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) decreased with a statistical trend up to 46\% at the highest dose. In vegetal fat diets, addition of DMG resulted in significant lower TBARS level by 56\% at the highest dose. Finally, a significant quadratic effect on ascites heart index was present in the vegetal fat diets, with a minimal value at 0.5 g Na-DMG/kg. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with DMG may improve technical and slaughter performance, and may reduce oxidative stress and pulmonary hypertension, but the degree of effects is modulated by fatty acid profile of the diet. Herewith, effects are more pronounced in a diet rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids compared with a diet rich in saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids.},
  author       = {Kalmar, Isabelle and Cools, An and Verstegen, Martin WA and Huyghebaert, Gerard and Buyse, Johan and Roose, Peter and Janssens, Geert},
  issn         = {0931-2439},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY AND ANIMAL NUTRITION},
  keyword      = {FISH-OIL,HYPERTENSION,RESISTANCE,VITAMIN-E,dose-response,ascites,dimethylglycine,performance,supplementation,nutrition,broiler},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {146--153},
  title        = {Dietary supplementation with dimethylglycine affects broiler performance and plasma metabolites depending on dose and dietary fatty acid profile},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0396.2010.01034.x},
  volume       = {95},
  year         = {2011},
}

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