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Atrial flutter with 1:1 conduction after administration of the antimalarial drug mefloquine

(1996) CLINICAL CARDIOLOGY. 19(12). p.967-968
Author
Organization
Abstract
Antimalarial drugs are well known for their cardiovascular toxicity. Quinine, the most famous antimalarial agent, mostly causes bradycardia. Quinidine, its dextrorotatory isomer, may cause 1:1 atrioventricular (AV) conduction during atrial Butter: The newly developed drug mefloquine was reported to have fewer cardiac side effects. We describe a 63-year-old male patient with atrial Butter in whom mefloquine use was associated with 1:1 AV conduction, and who then responded to therapy with digoxin and sotalol. The patient had a history of palpitations. This case report emphasizes that mefloquine should be used with caution in patients with a history of palpitations or underlying heart disease.
Keywords
atrial tachycardia, atrial flutter, antimalarial drugs, mefloquine, EFFICACY

Citation

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Chicago
Fonteyne, Winoc, A Bauwens, and Luc Jordaens. 1996. “Atrial Flutter with 1:1 Conduction After Administration of the Antimalarial Drug Mefloquine.” Clinical Cardiology 19 (12): 967–968.
APA
Fonteyne, Winoc, Bauwens, A., & Jordaens, L. (1996). Atrial flutter with 1:1 conduction after administration of the antimalarial drug mefloquine. CLINICAL CARDIOLOGY, 19(12), 967–968.
Vancouver
1.
Fonteyne W, Bauwens A, Jordaens L. Atrial flutter with 1:1 conduction after administration of the antimalarial drug mefloquine. CLINICAL CARDIOLOGY. 1996;19(12):967–8.
MLA
Fonteyne, Winoc, A Bauwens, and Luc Jordaens. “Atrial Flutter with 1:1 Conduction After Administration of the Antimalarial Drug Mefloquine.” CLINICAL CARDIOLOGY 19.12 (1996): 967–968. Print.
@article{191138,
  abstract     = {Antimalarial drugs are well known for their cardiovascular toxicity. Quinine, the most famous antimalarial agent, mostly causes bradycardia. Quinidine, its dextrorotatory isomer, may cause 1:1 atrioventricular (AV) conduction during atrial Butter: The newly developed drug mefloquine was reported to have fewer cardiac side effects. We describe a 63-year-old male patient with atrial Butter in whom mefloquine use was associated with 1:1 AV conduction, and who then responded to therapy with digoxin and sotalol. The patient had a history of palpitations. This case report emphasizes that mefloquine should be used with caution in patients with a history of palpitations or underlying heart disease.},
  author       = {Fonteyne, Winoc and Bauwens, A and Jordaens, Luc},
  issn         = {0160-9289},
  journal      = {CLINICAL CARDIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {atrial tachycardia,atrial flutter,antimalarial drugs,mefloquine,EFFICACY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {967--968},
  title        = {Atrial flutter with 1:1 conduction after administration of the antimalarial drug mefloquine},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {1996},
}